Jesus' Precious Little Lambs

A Charlotte Mason Christian Home School: Preschool – 3rd Grade :)

December Lesson Plans

2016-2017 Kindergarten and 2nd Grade

Fun Theme: Christmas

Seasonal Theme: Winter

Character/Habit: Obedience, Worship

Bible: Matthew-Acts

History/Geography: Ancient Rome, Europe

Science/Nature Study: 106 Days of Creation/Nature Journals

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Parent Study:

  • Read books by Alice Smith, one of God’s generals in the realm of intercession

Art, Music, and Poetry Study:

All Things Bright and Beautiful Blog

Picture study: Giotto Di Bondone

Composer Study: George Frideric Handel

Poetry Study: Favorite Poems Old and New, A Child’s Garden of Verses

Character/Habit Development:

Stewardship StreetOur Service board show kids what their daily assignments are. Noah is the green markers and Faith is the red markers (clay shaped into hearts).

  • Read stories “Flowers for Mother” p. 42 and “Beth’s New Shoes” p.124
  • Read through the book Making Brothers and Sisters Best Friends this school year
  • Use Keepers and Contenders of the Faith handbooks to work on spiritual life skills, personal skills, serving, homemaking, special knowledge skills, creative skills, and recreational skills. The kids can earn badges as they complete a checklist of activities for each skill. Working on this year:
    • Letter Writing
    • Serving Family
    • Serving Neighbors
    • Gardening
    • Embroidery
    • Archery
    • Counted Cross Stitch
    • Woodworking
    • Scrapbooking
  • Teach Faith, and review with Noah, the Stewardship Street memory verses that go with each of the 7 categories of savings, and the “Go to the ant checklist” poster by Doorposts together. Refine work habits and servant attitude; have children take a walk around the house each morning to observe what needs to be done and then select their own jobs on the I Can Serve board. Pay Noah (7) and Faith (6) in dimes once a week (natural math in an everyday situation); provide coaching as needed for budgeting.
  • Have Noah and Faith study and write out verses from their Habit Training Bible (AKA Child Study Bible–see “Bible” studies below) in their handwriting books as behavior needs arise
  • Use the stories and activities from Laying Down the Rails for Children for the habit of the month during circle time

Promise and Blessing Time:

Stand on Ephesians 6:1, “Children obey your parents,”  for ourselves and any other children who come to mind. Take time to speak a blessing, celebrate progress, and encourage more of the same behavior by speaking over our children:

________ is such an obedient boy/girl.

I really appreciate how quickly you obey, ________.

God is pleased with such immediate obedience, ________.

Thank you for remembering my instructions, ________ . They will be a garland to grace your head and a chain to adorn your neck.

Thank you for obeying, ________; it sure makes life easier for all of us when we obey.

(With each bullet above, try to include specific examples of obedience observed of each child as well)

Prayer and Discussion Time:

Prayer Time:

  • Prayer for Obedience
  • Pray and praise using various Names of God that reveal the many dimensions of His character
  • Ask God to search our hearts for areas of disobedience, acknowledge when and how we are/were disobedient. Thank God for ways we have been obedient. Ask God for our obedience and our siblings.
  • Use Instructions in Righteousness to help identify areas of persistant sin/disobedience (and its suggestions for rewards and punishments).

Discussion Time:

Obedience defined: Responding to the wishes of God, parents, and others in authority.

  • Do some obedience drills with multi-step instructions (please wash your hands, get a baby cup and fill it with water, choose a snack for the baby and cut it up, then leave it all at his highchair). Assess promptness, attitude, and thoroughness.
  • Create an obstacle course, blindold children, and lead them through using only your voice of instruction.
  • Tangibly reward obedience to poignantly illustrate our memory verse Eph. 6:1-3; most of all pray that that God will reward their obedience and that our children will have eyes to see His rewards
  • Take an obedience test several times during the month
  • Slowly savor thoughtful ideas, poems, and stories about obedience; read and discuss one a day:
  • Naughty Nellie
  • Dr. Johnson and His Father
  • Over in the Meadow
  • The Grizzly Bear and Her Cubs
  • Shining for Jesus
  • “Therefore to him that knoweth to do good, and doeth it not, to him it is sin” (James 4:17) Sometimes the problem is not in what we do, but in what don’t do.
  • 2 Cor. 10:5 Even our thoughts need to be obedient.

 

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Our Prayer Wall

Bible/Devotions:

  • Early Morning: Personal time: read in a variety of Bibles and Bible Storybooks, use prayer journals and practice listening for God’s voice, read Jesus Calling devotionals, pray and worship. Together time: Read Over the Edge devotional, worship acapella and with guitar, pray using the prayer wall.
  • School: Read and narrate stories from Matthew-Acts in my ESV Study Bible this year
  • Afternoon Quiet Time: Draw and write in Prayer Journals
  • Night: Family Bible study led by daddy

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Memory Verses:

“And I will give you a new heart, and a new spirit I will put within you. And I will remove the heart of stone from your flesh and give you a heart of flesh. And I will put my Spirit within you, and cause you to walk in my statutes and be careful to obey my rules.” Ezekiel 36:26-27

Review December verses from previous years:

  • Ephesians 6:1-3 “Children, obey your parents in the Lord, for this is right. ‘Honor your father and mother’ – which is the first commandment with a promise – ‘That it may go well with you and that you may enjoy long life on
    earth.’ ”
  • “Draw near to God, and He will draw near to you.” James 4:8
  • “For God so loved the world that He gave His only begotten Son, that whosoever believes in Him shall not perish, but have everlasting life.” John 3:16
  • “For unto us a child is born , unto us a son is given : and the government shall be upon his shoulder: and his name shall be called Wonderful, Counselor , The mighty God, The everlasting Father, The Prince of Peace. ”  Isaiah 9:6

 

 Hymns:

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Lovely hymns are full of more truth than many sermons (2nd and 3rd verses are often especially theologically deep), and can imprint precious truths on our hearts.

Poetry Recitation:

We are doing the playful and imaginative poems of Robert Louis Stevenson this year.

The Whole Duty of Children

A child should always say what’s true
 And speak when he is spoken to,
 And behave mannerly at table;
 At least as far as he is able.

Handwriting:

  • Write for Real Life: scripture promises, written letters, Christmas cards, birthday cards, thank you cards, shopping lists, nature journal entries, prayer journal entries, His Story book, blank books, spelling words, poem or memory verse copy work.
  • Hand write new reading words from Pathway readers. (Faith)
  • Print to Cursive. (Noah)

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Spelling: (Noah)

Noah studies, word builds, hand writes, and recites the spelling of all the new reading words from one story a week. Faith will practice working towards spelling as well this year through the same process. Noah doesn’t use the Pathway Series readers as readers, but rather as a fun way to provide the words for our spelling. We love the sweet stories in these books.

Reading: (Faith)

Faith practices reading to me this year from the first books in the Pathway series.

Vocabulary:

Most new words are learned naturally in conversation and through read alouds as words in question arise, but I also have Noah look and define up a word a week in his Vocabulary (& Spelling) Notebook to learn dictionary skills and to spur a love for new words.

Webster's American Dictionary of the English Language, 1828 Edition - By: Noah Webster

Literature Read Alouds:

Related image

Jotham's Journey: A Storybook for Advent - By: Arnold Ytreeide

Image result for This Way to Christmas

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History and Geography:

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  • 5 lessons a week from SCM’s Matthew-Acts & Ancient Rome. Noah will either narrate readings orally or narrate in his ‘His Story’ sketchbook with a drawing of what he remembers.

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  • One lesson a week from SCM’s Visits to Europe lesson plan book

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  • Do a few lessons from Home Geography (didn’t happen last year so we will try again!)

We loved reading about David Livingston from this series last year, so this year we plan on reading 3 more Christian hero biographies. (these definitely could be categorized as Character Development books as well)

Math:

Lessons are from Kathy Richardson’s math books and AL Math Card Games:

Understanding Geometry Book

Exploration Time: In the morning just before school, provide pattern blocks, unifix cubes, building blocks, tangrams, geoboards, tiles, pattern blocks, etc. for free exploration of math materials. What can you do with these materials? What did you notice? What did you have to do in order to make it? Try to observe while they are working, and sometimes make a comment about what you observe. When children need a suggestion ask, “I wonder if….” or “Do you think it would work to….?” or “Do you have another idea?,” so that they feel free to decide on their own.

Ongoing Review: Spend a few minutes once a week during math lessons to practice instant recognition of number combinations. Use homemade “flashcards” with arrangements of items that can be counted (like toothpicks or buttons that can be grouped into two numbers upon closer inspection in order to quickly find the total). Hold up a card and say, “Tell me fast. How many?” Sometimes ask, “How did you know?” (Cause there is a four and a three, and that’s seven) When recognizing groups of more than five easily, child will have to mentally combine the smaller groups that make up the larger ones.

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Mental Math: Everyday end each lesson with 5 minutes of “living math”–verbally present interesting scenarios that required the students to do mental calculations with math concepts they had already learned.

Noah’s Lessons: Pages 123-150 in Place Value, Multiplication, and Division book

Faith’s Lessons:

Complex Addition and Subtraction Stories (p32) Have children act out equalizing, missing addend, and comparative addition and subtraction stories.

  • Equalizing–Mark has six bowls, Carrie has 4. How many more will Carrie have to make to have the same number as Mark.
  • Missing Addend–Mark has six bowls. He needs 10. How many more does he need to get? OR Mark has 8 bowls now because he got 2 for his birthday. How many did he have before his birthday?
  • Comparative Subtraction–Mark has 6 bowls and Carrie has 4. How many more does Mark have than Carrie?

Race to Ten (p34) Use a 1-6 number cube, working space papers, and a “+/-” spinner. Take turns spinning to determine whether to add or subtract, and rolling to see how many counters to add or subtract. First person to reach 10 exactly wins. If there aren’t enough counters to subtract what is shown on the cube, the person loses their turn. If a person reaches a number higher than 10, use another working space paper.

Writing Stories to Go With Equations (p30) Write an equation, and model how to write a corresponding word problem. Children can then try writing a word problem of their own and make a drawing to illustrate the equation (that you provide).

Writing Equations with Counting Boards (p 38) Children place counters on several counting boards, tell addition/subtraction stories, and write equations.

Number Arrangements Using Cubes (p78) Have children make cube arrangements (into a simple design) for the number of the day, and talk about what number combinations they see in the arrangement.

Describing a Number By Its Parts (p 56) You and your child both make a cube train of a specified length (pick the right size number for your child). Give the signal “snap”, and both of you break your train into two parts any way you like. Take turns determining the number combination in each others hands (“3 and 2″ or “1 and 4″ for a train of 5 for example). For numbers greater than 6, say how many cubes to break off, give child time to determine the combination, and then ask, “How many?” The next level to this activity is for each person to keep one hand behind his/her back, and have your partner predict how many cubes are hidden. Then check predictions.

Plus and Minus Train (p 35) Make 2 gameboards with the outline of cube train 2o cubes long. Each player puts 20 cubes on a gameboard. The goal is to be the first to completely clear his or her board. Each player rolls a 1-6 number cube (dice) and spins a spinner with minus sign on one side and plus sign on the other to see how many cubes to add or take off. Players lose a turn if they have to add more cubes than there are spaces available.

 

Science/Nature Study:

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Spanish:

We are meeting with Miss Maria and her family once a week to learn conversational Spanish through music and art! What a blessing! Maybe, maybe we keep trying to use the following book (we struggled last year with it):

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Videos:

Reading Rainbow, Moody Science Classics, BBC’s Planet nature shows are what we primarily rotate through at Family Movie Night on Fun Friday. We love all 3!

Traditions and Fun Friday Projects:

Pick out a Christmas Gift to give together from Samaritan’s Purse Catalog. As we try  to focus our hearts on giving at this crazy commercial time of year, we have been reading about a gift opportunity or two from the Samaritan’s Purse catalog each night at the dinner table.

Shepherds Pouches can provide a meaningful way to help kids earn money for the chosen Samaritans Purse gift. This year the kids also plan to sell handmade praise ribbons at our homeschool support group’s Christmas Boutique to help raise money.

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Make a manger and a baby Jesus to put under the Christmas tree; nurture some stolen moments of fascination and worship of the newborn King with the littlest in the family

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Have a Happy Birthday Baby Jesus Pajama Party!

Have the children wrap a small toy of their own and bring to school to do a gift exchange. Talk about giving. Have a “cake” with candles for baby Jesus, sing happy birthday, wear party hats, etc. Give a small swaddled baby Jesus wrapped up in a gift box for each child to take home with a gift tag: To Noah, Jesus is my gift to you. Love, God

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Christmas Train Painting (vintage wrapping paper for inspiration)Merry Christmas Train Gift Wrap. Wrapping Paper. Christmas Holiday XMas Trains Snow Santa Retro Trees Kids Baby. Gift Wrap. Presents Gifts

Paint/Chalk a picture of Mary and Baby Jesus 

or a nativity chalk pastel

Nativity Silhouette

Decorate Faithy’s Dollhouse for Christmas.

Sylvanian family Christmas Decorated house / manor - FULLY furnished AND figs! | eBay

Caroling gives children a unique opportunity to spread the gospel. For a few years we have sung this song and other traditional hymn favorites around the neighborhood, and one year we passed out twiggy star ornaments. Last year, the kids were super excited about caroling and needed no nudging like prior years–they were pulling daddy and I around the neighborhood, Praise God.

Don’t let the tradition die out! Let the kids dress up, gather a caroling party, and announce the Good News at around the neighborhood or even at a care home.

Our Christmas Kids Choir Singing at a Care Home was so Sweet

Caroling in the Neighborhood

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Find or make an ornament that depicts what God has done in the past year for the family, or for each individual (so kids have their own set to take when grown)

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Nature excursions can provide opportunity to collect leaves, evergreen boughs, pine cones, and berries to decorate home. Build a manger for baby doll Jesus from collected sticks.

Nature-Inspired Front Door Christmas Garland

Make baby Jesus a blanket (still trying to do this after 4 years now! Haha)

Make a Christmas Wish List to Keep

Have friends and neighbors over for Christmas tea

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Field trips:

Go ice skating

Go to a Live Nativity in Santa Clara

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Noah beading a bracelet at a Live Nativity (note the gold bracelet on his wrist, HA)

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November Lesson Plans

2016-2017 Kindergarten and 2nd Grade

Fun Theme: Thanksgiving

Seasonal Theme: Fall

Character/Habit: Thankfulness, Generosity, and Compassion vs. Selfishness

Bible: Matthew-Acts

History/Geography: Ancient Rome, Europe

Science/Nature Study: 106 Days of Creation/Nature Journals

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Parent Study:

  • Read books by Alice Smith, one of God’s generals in the realm of intercession

Art, Music, and Poetry Study:

All Things Bright and Beautiful Blog

Picture study: Giotto Di Bondone

Composer Study: George Frideric Handel

Poetry Study: Favorite Poems Old and New, A Child’s Garden of Verses

Character/Habit Development:

Stewardship StreetOur Service board show kids what their daily assignments are. Noah is the green markers and Faith is the red markers (clay shaped into hearts).

  • Read stories “Cheeseburger Pie” p. 31 and “Lending to the Lord” p.36 and “Timmy’s Blessing” p. 129 in Growing with the Millers
  • Read through the book Making Brothers and Sisters Best Friends this school year
  • Use Keepers and Contenders of the Faith handbooks to work on spiritual life skills, personal skills, serving, homemaking, special knowledge skills, creative skills, and recreational skills. The kids can earn badges as they complete a checklist of activities for each skill. Working on this year:
    • Letter Writing
    • Serving Family
    • Serving Neighbors
    • Gardening
    • Embroidery
    • Archery
    • Counted Cross Stitch
    • Woodworking
    • Scrapbooking
  • Teach Faith, and review with Noah, the Stewardship Street memory verses that go with each of the 7 categories of savings, and the “Go to the ant checklist” poster by Doorposts together. Refine work habits and servant attitude; have children take a walk around the house each morning to observe what needs to be done and then select their own jobs on the I Can Serve board. Pay Noah (7) and Faith (6) in dimes once a week (natural math in an everyday situation); provide coaching as needed for budgeting.
  • Have Noah and Faith study and write out verses from their Habit Training Bible (AKA Child Study Bible–see “Bible” studies below) in their handwriting books as behavior needs arise
  • Use the stories and activities from Laying Down the Rails for Children for the habit of the month during circle time

Circle Time/Family Time:

Blessing Time:

  • Prophecy Philippians 4:8 over our thoughts.

Whatever is true, whatever is honorable, whatever is just, whatever is pure, whatever is lovely, whatever is commendable, if there is any excellence, if there is anything worthy of praise, I think about these things.

  • Speak Psalms 82:3-4 and Isaiah 58:7-8 over our desire to reach out.

I defend the cause of the weak and fatherless, and maintain the rights of the poor and oppressed. I rescue the weak and needy, and deliver them from the hand of the wicked.

I share my bread with the hungry,
I bring to my house the poor who are cast out;
When you see the naked, I cover him…..
Then my light shall break forth like the morning,
My healing shall spring forth speedily,
And my righteousness shall go before me;
The glory of the Lord shall be my rear guard.

Prayer Time

  • Pray provision for the needy according to Isaiah 41:17-20

“The poor and needy search for water, but there is none; their tongues are parched with thirst. But I the Lord will answer them; I, the God of Israel, will not forsake them. I will make rivers flow on barren heights, and springs within the valleys. I will turn the desert into pools of water, and the parched ground into springs. I will put in the desert the cedar and the acacia, the myrtle and the olive. I will set junipers in the wasteland, the fir and the cypress together, so that people may see and know, may consider and understand, that the hand of the Lord has done this, that the Holy One of Israel has created it.”

  • Pray these simple prayers with little ones:
  • Dear God, if I am being selfish or greedy, please show me so I can tell You I am sorry. Amen.
  • Dear God, please forgive me for thinking of myself instead of others. Please send Your Holy Spirit to help me be generous instead. Amen.
  • Dear God, please help me to be generous so I can refresh others. Amen. (The generous will prosper; those who refresh others will themselves be refreshed. proverbs 11:25)
  • Dear God, sometimes I have selfishness in my heart. Please send Your Holy Spirit to smother it like water smothers fire. Amen.
  • Dear God, it is so easy to want things for myself. Please help me to think of others instead. Amen.
  • Dear God, please show my family and me how we can help the poor people who live in our community. Amen.

Sharing Time:

  • Share personal stories of experience with generosity, compassion, and gratitude. Thank God in prayer.
  • What are you tempted to complain about? What are you selfish about? Ask God for help.
  • What are you most thankful for? Thank God in prayer.
  • How would you like to generously help or give to others to help the world know Jesus? Ask God for help.

Discussion Time:

  • Pray over the stories we receive from Samaritan’s purse in their quarterly magazine, Prayer Point and the Voice of the Martyrs Magazine
  • Treasures in Heaven activity (use a 100’s chart and apply some math)
  • What do you think Jesus meant when He said, “A man’s life does not consist in the abundance of his possessions” (Luke 12:15)? Satan wants to steal joy from our lives by making us ungrateful for all that we have. He wants us to think about what we don’t have, instead of being thankful for what we do have. Is there anything you find it hard to thank God for?
  • Teach children how to give creative and powerful thanksgiving to God with Names of God Prayers
  • Seeing the Bright Side game
  • Slowly savor thoughtful ideas about generosity and compassion, read and discuss one a day:
    • “The miracle is this–the more we share, the more we have”–Leonard Nimoy
    • The Magic Penny song
    • Proverbs 11:24-25 “One person gives freely, yet gains even more….”
    • “If nature has made you for a giver, your hands are born open, and so is your heart; and though there may be times when your hands are empty, your heart is always full, and you can give things out of that. –Frances Hodgson Burnett

    • Little Sunshine (story of how its the thought that counts)
    • Old Mr. Rabbits Thanksgiving Dinner in The Book of Virtues
    • The Legend of the Dipper (one small act of kindness can turn into something very great)
    • The Parable of the Good Samaritan in Luke 10
    • Grandmother’s Table (compassion requires putting yourself in someone else’s shoes)
    • Mother Theresa from Heroes for my Son
    • Read Elizabeth Fry’s story from Hero Tales
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Our Prayer Wall

Bible/Devotions:

  • Early Morning: Personal time: read in a variety of Bibles and Bible Storybooks, use prayer journals and practice listening for God’s voice, read Jesus Calling devotionals, pray and worship. Together time: Read Over the Edge devotional, worship acapella and with guitar, pray using the prayer wall.
  • School: Read and narrate stories from Matthew-Acts in my ESV Study Bible this year
  • Afternoon Quiet Time: Draw and write in Prayer Journals
  • Night: Family Bible study led by daddy

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Memory Verses:

Review November verses from previous years:

Psalm 100 for giving thanks.

Make a joyful noise to the Lord, all the earth!
Serve the Lord with gladness!
Come into his presence with singing!

Know that the Lord, he is God!
It is he who made us, and we are his;
we are his people, and the sheep of his pasture.

Enter his gates with thanksgiving,
and his courts with praise!
Give thanks to him; bless his name!

For the Lord is good;
his steadfast love endures forever,
and his faithfulness to all generations.

 

  • “Whenever you are able, do good to people who need help.” Proverbs 3:27
  • “Rejoice always, pray without ceasing, in everything give thanks; for this is the will of God in Christ Jesus for you. ”  1 Thessalonians 5:16-18

 Hymns:

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Poetry Recitation:

We are doing the playful and imaginative poems of Robert Louis Stevenson this year.

 Travel

I should like to rise and go   
Where the golden apples grow;—   
Where below another sky   
Parrot islands anchored lie,   
And, watched by cockatoos and goats, 
Lonely Crusoes building boats;—   
Where in sunshine reaching out   
Eastern cities, miles about,   
Are with mosque and minaret   
Among sandy gardens set,
And the rich goods from near and far   
Hang for sale in the bazaar,—   
Where the Great Wall round China goes,   
And on one side the desert blows,   
And with bell and voice and drum
Cities on the other hum;—   
Where are forests, hot as fire,   
Wide as England, tall as a spire,   
Full of apes and cocoa-nuts   
And the negro hunters’ huts;—
Where the knotty crocodile   
Lies and blinks in the Nile,   
And the red flamingo flies   
Hunting fish before his eyes;—   
Where in jungles, near and far,
Man-devouring tigers are,   
Lying close and giving ear   
Lest the hunt be drawing near,   
Or a comer-by be seen   
Swinging in a palanquin;—
Where among the desert sands   
Some deserted city stands,   
All its children, sweep and prince,   
Grown to manhood ages since,   
Not a foot in street or house,
Not a stir of child or mouse,   
And when kindly falls the night,   
In all the town no spark of light.   
There I’ll come when I’m a man   
With a camel caravan;
Light a fire in the gloom   
Of some dusty dining-room;   
See the pictures on the walls,   
Heroes, fights and festivals;   
And in a corner find the toys
Of the old Egyptian boys.

Handwriting:

  • Write for Real Life: scripture promises, written letters, birthday cards, thank you cards, shopping lists, nature journal entries, prayer journal entries, His Story book, blank books, spelling words, poem or memory verse copy work.
  • Hand write new reading words from Pathway readers. (Faith)
  • Print to Cursive. (Noah)

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Spelling: (Noah)

Noah studies, word builds, hand writes, and recites the spelling of all the new reading words from one story a week. Faith will practice working towards spelling as well this year through the same process. Noah doesn’t use the Pathway Series readers as readers, but rather as a fun way to provide the words for our spelling. We love the sweet stories in these books.

Reading: (Faith)

Faith practices reading to me this year from the first books in the Pathway series.

Vocabulary:

Most new words are learned naturally in conversation and through read alouds as words in question arise, but I also have Noah look and define up a word a week in his Vocabulary (& Spelling) Notebook to learn dictionary skills and to spur a love for new words.

Webster's American Dictionary of the English Language, 1828 Edition - By: Noah Webster

Literature Read Alouds:

Image result for a long walk to water the boy whoImage result for the boy who harnessed the wind

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History and Geography:

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  • 5 lessons a week from SCM’s Matthew-Acts & Ancient Rome. Noah will either narrate readings orally or narrate in his ‘His Story’ sketchbook with a drawing of what he remembers.

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  • One lesson a week from SCM’s Visits to Europe lesson plan book

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  • Do a few lessons from Home Geography (didn’t happen last year so we will try again!)

We loved reading about David Livingston from this series last year, so this year we plan on reading 3 more Christian hero biographies. (these definitely could be categorized as Character Development books as well)

Math:

Lessons are from Kathy Richardson’s math books and AL Math Card Games:

Understanding Geometry Book

Exploration Time: In the morning just before school, provide pattern blocks, unifix cubes, building blocks, tangrams, geoboards, tiles, pattern blocks, etc. for free exploration of math materials. What can you do with these materials? What did you notice? What did you have to do in order to make it? Try to observe while they are working, and sometimes make a comment about what you observe. When children need a suggestion ask, “I wonder if….” or “Do you think it would work to….?” or “Do you have another idea?,” so that they feel free to decide on their own.

Ongoing Review: Spend a few minutes once a week during math lessons to practice instant recognition of number combinations. Use homemade “flashcards” with arrangements of items that can be counted (like toothpicks or buttons that can be grouped into two numbers upon closer inspection in order to quickly find the total). Hold up a card and say, “Tell me fast. How many?” Sometimes ask, “How did you know?” (Cause there is a four and a three, and that’s seven) When recognizing groups of more than five easily, child will have to mentally combine the smaller groups that make up the larger ones.

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Mental Math: Everyday end each lesson with 5 minutes of “living math”–verbally present interesting scenarios that required the students to do mental calculations with math concepts they had already learned.

Noah’s Lessons: Pages 53, 116-131, and  in Place Value, Multiplication, and Division book

Faith’s Lessons:

Complex Addition and Subtraction Stories (p32) Have children act out equalizing, missing addend, and comparative addition and subtraction stories.

  • Equalizing–Mark has six bowls, Carrie has 4. How many more will Carrie have to make to have the same number as Mark.
  • Missing Addend–Mark has six bowls. He needs 10. How many more does he need to get? OR Mark has 8 bowls now because he got 2 for his birthday. How many did he have before his birthday?
  • Comparative Subtraction–Mark has 6 bowls and Carrie has 4. How many more does Mark have than Carrie?

Race to Ten (p34) Use a 1-6 number cube, working space papers, and a “+/-” spinner. Take turns spinning to determine whether to add or subtract, and rolling to see how many counters to add or subtract. First person to reach 10 exactly wins. If there aren’t enough counters to subtract what is shown on the cube, the person loses their turn. If a person reaches a number higher than 10, use another working space paper.

Writing Stories to Go With Equations (p30) Write an equation, and model how to write a corresponding word problem. Children can then try writing a word problem of their own and make a drawing to illustrate the equation (that you provide).

Writing Equations with Counting Boards (p 38) Children place counters on several counting boards, tell addition/subtraction stories, and write equations.

Number Arrangements Using Cubes (p78) Have children make cube arrangements (into a simple design) for the number of the day, and talk about what number combinations they see in the arrangement.

Describing a Number By Its Parts (p 56) You and your child both make a cube train of a specified length (pick the right size number for your child). Give the signal “snap”, and both of you break your train into two parts any way you like. Take turns determining the number combination in each others hands (“3 and 2″ or “1 and 4″ for a train of 5 for example). For numbers greater than 6, say how many cubes to break off, give child time to determine the combination, and then ask, “How many?” The next level to this activity is for each person to keep one hand behind his/her back, and have your partner predict how many cubes are hidden. Then check predictions.

 

Science/Nature Study:

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Spanish:

We are meeting with Miss Maria and her family once a week to learn conversational Spanish through music and art! What a blessing! Maybe, maybe we keep trying to use the following book (we struggled last year with it):

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Videos:

Reading Rainbow, Moody Science Classics, BBC’s Planet nature shows are what we primarily rotate through at Family Movie Night on Fun Friday. We love all 3!

Traditions and Fun Friday Projects:

100 Ways for Your Family to Make a Difference

 

Make and pass out soup to the homeless in our downtown area

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Pack an Operation Christmas Child Shoebox

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Make a thankful tree

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Fieldtrips:

  • Markham Nature Park–observe and journal
  • Monterey Bay Aquarium

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October Lesson Plans

2016-2017 Kindergarten and 2nd Grade

The Power of Imagination

Its hero month! Children, especially boys, are very naturally attracted to heroes. Sadly, marketers take advantage of our boys’ need to forge their identity (especially in adolescence) and sell them a narrow version of masculinity. Today’s superheroes are macho, aggressive, and sarcastic–sending a strong, but wrong message about masculinity. True heroism arises out of a perception of what is good, right, and beautiful, and that is why we need to point our boys to true men of courage, honor, and faith! October is one of my most favorite themes at Jesus’ Precious Lambs. We dream about what we will become, we imagine and play heroes, we stir up our faith in God’s promises over our life calling, and we let Jesus Christ form a more perfect picture in our hearts of our true identity.

I picked up Sarah Clarkson’s book, Caught Up in a Story: Fostering a Storyformed Life of Great Books and Imagination when God began showing me the beauty and power of imagination in shaping a child’s life. Often we study courage in October as our character development theme; this month we will also study the ‘Charlotte Mason recommended’ habit of imagination. One thing we heartily agree with in the book is purposely choosing slower days at home over the mad rush of modern family life, for the very purpose of fostering imagination. At this very moment, like so many afternoons, Noah and Faith are exercising their imaginations in the backyard inventing a cat trap, and Faith is spouting off a poem she made up while discussing an idea involving the creation of a fairy tale forest critter village with mushrooms and bark houses and so much more. Fun!

These are some of my favorite quotes from Sarah Clarkson’s Book:

“It is the memory of the beauty, and the hope for its restoration, that strengthens the hero or heroine in their battle and quest.”

“Before they can rightly cope with evil, children need a bone deep knowledge of what is good…..They need minds stocked with imagery of love, beauty, laughter, and song before they will have the necessary hope to shield then in their battle with sin.”

Distraction, whether via TV, constant activity, or ceaseless entertainment; cynicism, which is simply boredom with what is beautiful; and fear are the natural enemies of wonder.”

“…..really seeing is “wonder.” Wonder is a state of mind in which the sight and senses are wholly awake and engaged in what is before them. Wonder reveals the world as the miracle that it is–the veined crimson of an autumn leaf, the play of sunlight in summer trees, the ripple of light over water……Wonder is what compels us to notice with quiet, focused eyes, eyes that perceive the unique beauty of the people and the living world all around.”

“It is the flexed muscle called imagination that positions a child to hope, to dream, to live with soul alive and mind awake.”

“Imagination, as the driving force of creativity, insight, and faith, is a gift that can set any young child on the road to spiritual discovery and artistic ingenuity. But it is a faculty that must be actively kindled, cultivated, and nourished from the earliest years. Every child is born with a strong imagination and the human drive to discover and create. This is why it is no less than a tragedy when childlike imagination, our gift and birthright, atrophies and dies.”

“We live by a relentless cultural drive to produce and perform that causes us to focus children, even at an early age, on practical rather than imaginative activities. We bombard children with lessons, measure them with tests, and give them no time for boredom…..we devalue times of quiet…..we see things such as art, music, and literature as peripheral subjects……and then there is technology…..When children learn early in their lives to depend on technology for entertainment and information, they lose the habit of imagination.”

“But a child whose days are steeped in hours of reflection will have an inner picture, a self-made idea of the action he wants to accomplish. A child given the mental space and even the boredom necessary to prompt imaginative exploration, will have whole worlds of possibility driving her goals and dreams of real world accomplishment. The activities of artistic endeavor, leadership, and innovation all proceed from meaningful reflection; worthwhile action in life is driven by inner conviction, perception, and belief.”

“To a strong imagination any dream can be made real.”

God has been faithful to answer our prayers for imagination here as the kids had a summer filled with imaginative discussions and new inventions . . . . .  but now I would love to see some follow through on those ideas! I wonder what the Word has to say about that? 🙂

I pray that the eyes of our hearts may be enlightened (to imagine!), so that we will know what is the hope of His calling, what are the riches of the glory of His inheritance in the saints. Ephesians 1:18

More posts on imagination:

2016-2017 Kindergarten and 2nd Grade

Fun Theme: When I Grow Up. . . .  /Heroes (Christ, Parents, Community Helpers, Historical Figures, and Fictional Characters)

Seasonal Theme: Fall, Scarecrows

Character/Habit: Imagination

Bible: Matthew-Acts

History/Geography: Ancient Rome, Europe

Science/Nature Study: 106 Days of Creation/Nature Journals

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Parent Study:

 

  • Read books by Alice Smith, one of God’s generals in the realm of intercession

Art, Music, and Poetry Study:

All Things Bright and Beautiful Blog

Picture study: Monet (by Taschen)

Composer Study: The Best of Vivaldi

Poetry Study: Favorite Poems Old and New, A Child’s Garden of Verses

Character/Habit Development:

Stewardship StreetOur Service board show kids what their daily assignments are. Noah is the green markers and Faith is the red markers (clay shaped into hearts).

  • Read stories “The Girl Who Couldn’t be Frightened” p. 12 and “The Bullet that Flieth by Night” p.66 in Growing with the Millers
  • Read through the book Making Brothers and Sisters Best Friends this school year
  • Use Keepers and Contenders of the Faith handbooks to work on spiritual life skills, personal skills, serving, homemaking, special knowledge skills, creative skills, and recreational skills. The kids can earn badges as they complete a checklist of activities for each skill. Working on this year:
    • Letter Writing
    • Serving Family
    • Serving Neighbors
    • Gardening
    • Embroidery
    • Archery
    • Counted Cross Stitch
    • Woodworking
    • Scrapbooking
  • Teach Faith, and review with Noah, the Stewardship Street memory verses that go with each of the 7 categories of savings, and the “Go to the ant checklist” poster by Doorposts together. Refine work habits and servant attitude; have children take a walk around the house each morning to observe what needs to be done and then select their own jobs on the I Can Serve board. Pay Noah (7) and Faith (6) in dimes once a week (natural math in an everyday situation); provide coaching as needed for budgeting.
  • Have Noah and Faith study and write out verses from their Habit Training Bible (AKA Child Study Bible–see “Bible” studies below) in their handwriting books as behavior needs arise
  • Use the stories and activities from Laying Down the Rails for Children for the habit of the month during circle time

 

Circle Time/Family Time:

Blessing and Promise Time:

Prophesy Ephesians 1:18 over ourselves.

I pray that the eyes of our hearts may be enlightened (to imagine!), so that we will know what is the hope of His calling, what are the riches of the glory of His inheritance in the saints.

Prayer Time

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Our Prayer Wall

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • Use our Prayer Wall to help us pray for current/urgent needs (on the chalkboard), as well as our family (slips of paper with all the promises we have stood on over the years), the world (slips of paper with the names of the countries we have studied in geography so far), and our loved ones (slips of paper with the names of friends and extended family).
  • Print out and pray scriptures this month about having a strong identity formed in Christ.
  • Continue Praying for people of the nations, especially places we learn about in history/geography studies. Use the children’s book, Window on the World:When we Pray God Works, to inform us about nations and people groups, and provide prayer points for both.

Sharing Time:

  • Choose a promise from scripture for your life this school year based on your personal needs/desires that we can all stand on and pray over you regularly throughout the year.
  • Do something really brave this month and share about it at circle
  • Bring a picture and story of someone who is a hero to you
  • What do you want to be when you grow up? Share some interesting information about that type of job.

Discussion Time:

Read these stories, poems, & quotes/do the activities, and then start a discussion.

Courage (Review):

  • “Mental or moral strength to venture, persevere, and withstand danger, fear, or difficulty.”
    • Slowly savor thoughtful ideas about courage, discuss one a day:
      • selfishness makes us cowards, but thinking of others makes us braver
      • we become brave by doing brave acts
      • we practice bravery by acting brave when we don’t really feel brave
      • the brave person is not someone who is never afraid
      • the fear of failures never hurts as bad as we expect them to
      • we imagine our fears into existence (Job and Chicken Little)
      • to refrain from foolish cowardice, refrain from too much mountain-making our of molehills
  • “Heroism comes from a perception of what is good, right, and beautiful, and a will to claim it and defend it.” –Sarah Clarkson
  • Read short true stories about the lives of Christian heroes

Imagination:

  • “There are no days in life that are so memorable as those that vibrate to some stroke of the imagination.” -Ralph Waldo Emerson

  • The Story of a Great Story An example of how the idea for Robinson Crusoe was sparked.
  • “Doubt and fear neutralize what God wants to do in your life. It takes courage to imagine. Do you know why most people don’t imagine? Because they’re afraid of failure.” -Rick Warren
  • Does fear or faith govern your imagination?
    If you let your imagination be governed by fear, you’re going to go around being freaked out, stressed out, and worried all the time. Imagination governed by faith is filled with all kinds of possibilities because “with God all things are possible.”
  • Imagination defined–mental pictures of things not present. Faith works with Imagination by allowing the Holy Spirit to develop a photograph upon our hearts of our potential destinies. 
  • The devil wants us to be blind to what God has thought and determined for us. When our imaginations are not Godly (provide examples), we need to cast down thoughts that steal our joy, and then raise up the vision of God for our life (provide examples). When God enlightens the eyes of our hearts, wonderful things begin to happen.
    • Casting down imaginations, and every high thing that exalteth itself against the knowledge of God, and bringing into captivity every thought to the obedience of Christ…” 2 Corinthians 10:5
    • I pray that the eyes of our hearts may be enlightened, so that we will know what is the hope of His calling, what are the riches of the glory of His inheritance in the saints. Ephesians 1:18 (Enlightened is translated as ‘photizo’ from which we get the word photograph
  • Children have the strongest most unrestrained imaginations. What would God have you imagine while you are young, so that you may live it when you are old?
  • What/who we admire, we tend to become. Who are the people and what are their qualities that you imagine yourself becoming like? Who are some of your heroes and what are they like?
  • Everything that has been created by mankind: skyscrapers, skis, cars, computers, buildings, boulevards, coffee cups, cotton balls and even things immaterial such as concepts and philosophies all began in the mind of someone before they became reality. What could God use you to do?
  • Practice using imaginative narration methods such as puppets, or drawing or acting the story out more often.

Bible/Devotions:

  • Early Morning: Personal time: read in a variety of Bibles and Bible Storybooks, use prayer journals and practice listening for God’s voice, read Jesus Calling devotionals, pray and worship. Together time: Read Over the Edge devotional, worship acapella and with guitar, pray using the prayer wall.
  • School: Read and narrate stories from Matthew-Acts in my ESV Study Bible this year
  • Afternoon Quiet Time: Draw and write in Prayer Journals
  • Night: Family Bible study led by daddy

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Memory Verses:

Romans 15:1-2 “We who are strong have an obligation to bear with the failings of the weak, and not to please ourselves. Let each of us please his neighbor for his good, to build him up.”

Also we will review all verses from previous Octobers:

  • ‘And in the last days it shall be, God declares, that I will pour out my Spirit on all flesh, and your sons and your daughters shall prophesy, and your young men shall see visions, and your old men shall dream dreams.” Acts 2:17
  • Psalm 23
  • “God is our refuge and strength, a very present help in trouble.” Psalm 46:1
  • “Be of good courage, and he shall strengthen your heart, all ye that hope in the Lord.” Psalms 31:24

 Hymns:

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Poetry Recitation:

We are doing the playful and imaginative poems of Robert Louis Stevenson this year.

Handwriting:

  • Write for Real Life: scripture promises, written letters, birthday cards, thank you cards, shopping lists, nature journal entries, prayer journal entries, His Story book, blank books, spelling words, poem or memory verse copy work.
  • Hand write new reading words from Pathway readers. (Faith)
  • Print to Cursive. (Noah)

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Spelling: (Noah)

Noah will study, word build, hand write, and recite the spelling of all the new reading words from one story a week. Faith will practice working towards spelling as well this year through the same process. Noah doesn’t use the Pathway Series readers as readers, but rather as a fun way to provide the words for our spelling. We love the sweet stories in these books.

Reading: (Faith)

Faith will practice reading to me this year from the first two or three books in the Pathway series.

Vocabulary:

Most new words are learned naturally in conversation and through read alouds as words in question arise, but I also have Noah look and define up a word a week in his Vocabulary (& Spelling) Notebook to learn dictionary skills and to spur a love for new words.

Webster's American Dictionary of the English Language, 1828 Edition - By: Noah Webster

Literature Read Alouds:

 

 

 

 

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Book Jacket for: LocomotiveBook Jacket for: Moonshot : the flight of Apollo 11

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History and Geography:

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  • 5 lessons a week from SCM’s Matthew-Acts & Ancient Rome. Noah will either narrate readings orally or narrate in his ‘His Story’ sketchbook with a drawing of what he remembers.

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  • One lesson a week from SCM’s Visits to Europe lesson plan book

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  • Do a few lessons from Home Geography (didn’t happen last year so we will try again!)

We loved reading about David Livingston from this series last year, so this year we plan on reading 3 more Christian hero biographies. (these definitely could be categorized as Character Development books as well)

Math:

Lessons are from Kathy Richardson’s math books and AL Math Card Games:

Understanding Geometry Book

Exploration Time: In the morning just before school, provide pattern blocks, unifix cubes, building blocks, tangrams, geoboards, tiles, pattern blocks, etc. for free exploration of math materials. What can you do with these materials? What did you notice? What did you have to do in order to make it? Try to observe while they are working, and sometimes make a comment about what you observe. When children need a suggestion ask, “I wonder if….” or “Do you think it would work to….?” or “Do you have another idea?,” so that they feel free to decide on their own.

Ongoing Review: Spend a few minutes once a week during math lessons to practice instant recognition of number combinations. Use homemade “flashcards” with arrangements of items that can be counted (like toothpicks or buttons that can be grouped into two numbers upon closer inspection in order to quickly find the total). Hold up a card and say, “Tell me fast. How many?” Sometimes ask, “How did you know?” (Cause there is a four and a three, and that’s seven) When recognizing groups of more than five easily, child will have to mentally combine the smaller groups that make up the larger ones.

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Mental Math: Everyday end each lesson with 5 minutes of “living math”–verbally present interesting scenarios that required the students to do mental calculations with math concepts they had already learned.

Noah’s Lessons: Pages 50-56 and 76-85 in Place Value, Multiplication, and Division book

Faith’s Lessons:

Grow and Shrink (p28) Children roll a 1-6 number cube and place the appropriate number of counters on working space paper (paper with 10 dots to place counters on). Children roll again, then verbalize (and write) how many counters will need to be added or subtracted in order to change the first rolled number into the second rolled number. For example, child rolls a six, and puts out six counters. Then child rolls a four, so he says ” I need to take away two” and also write “-2” on a slip of paper. Then roll again to keep adding or subtracting from whatever number is on the paper. Use two working space papers if there are too many counters to fit, or say “not enough” if taking away more counters than what is left on the paper is required.

Race to Ten (p34) Use a 1-6 number cube, working space papers, and a “+/-” spinner. Take turns spinning to determine whether to add or subtract, and rolling to see how many counters to add or subtract. First person to reach 10 exactly wins. If there aren’t enough counters to subtract what is shown on the cube, the person loses their turn. If a person reaches a number higher than 10, use another working space paper.

Writing Equations to Label Addition and Subtraction Stories (p 29) Act out addition and subtraction stories using counters and counting boards, and have children practice writing the matching equation with or without a model.

Writing Stories to Go With Equations (p30) Write an equation, and model how to write a corresponding word problem. Children can then try writing a word problem of their own and make a drawing to illustrate the equation (that you provide).

The Wall Game (p 59) Pick a number to work with for the day. Arrange that number of counters on a piece of paper forming a vertical line. Children use their hands to make a wall that breaks the line. Call out whatever number you want them to wall off. Children say the number combinations (2 behind the wall, 4 in front, 2 and 4 make 6).

Number Arrangements Using Cubes (p78)

Have children make cube arrangements (into a simple design) for the number of the day, and talk about what number combinations they see in the arrangement.

Describing a Number By Its Parts (p 56)

You and your child both make a cube train of a specified length (pick the right size number for your child). Give the signal “snap”, and both of you break your train into two parts any way you like. Take turns determining the number combination in each others hands (“3 and 2″ or “1 and 4″ for a train of 5 for example). For numbers greater than 6, say how many cubes to break off, give child time to determine the combination, and then ask, “How many?” The next level to this activity is for each person to keep one hand behind his/herback, and have your partner predict how many cubes are hidden. Then check predictions.

Counting Boards: Reading Equations (p 33)

Provide counting boards for children to represent the problem on a subtraction/addition card. For example, place a “4-2” card under a picture of a tree. Have child decide what the cubes will represent (apples, cherries, oranges, birds, etc) and then place them on the boards in groups that represent the problem.

Science/Nature Study:

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Spanish:

We are meeting with Miss Maria and her family once a week to learn conversational Spanish through music and art! What a blessing! Maybe, maybe we keep trying to use the following book (we struggled last year with it):

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Videos:

Reading Rainbow, Moody Science Classics, BBC’s Planet nature shows are what we primarily rotate through at Family Movie Night on Fun Friday. We love all 3!

Traditions and Fun Friday Projects:

Watercolor resist leaves, crayon rubbings, or charcoal rubbings

CHARCOAL LEAF ART for kids. Charcoal is a super medium for kids to use to explore the shape, texture and patterns of leaves.:

Leaf Art

.Amazing DIY leaf craft inspiration from Look What I Did With a Leaf:

https://jesuspreciouslittlelambs.files.wordpress.com/2016/09/fc2ac-scan_201510242b252822529.jpg?w=664&h=860

Fall Snack

.16 Healthy Spring Recipes for Kids | GleamItUp:

Dress Up and Play Heroes

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Make and Deliver Fall Blessings as an outreach to neighbors

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Collect Signs of Fall

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Arrange a Community Helper Fieldtrip

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Do a Fall Leaf Scavenger Hunt (provide a picture of a leaf and then hunt it down at the Nature Park, or provide a leaf and go find the tree)

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Rake Leaves and Jump In!

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Fieldtrips:

  • Markham Nature Park–observe and journal
  • Clayton Pumpkin Patch
  • Air Show
  • Ardenwood Harvest Festival
  • Safari West
  • Homeschool Day at Sacramento Railroad Museum

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May Lesson Plans

Its time to praise the Lord for another remarkable school year, and as we learn about the spiritual habit of praise, we will get to put it into practice at a very fitting time! We will be reflecting on our year as we rejoice in God’s goodness! We are also rejoicing this year that our little girl Faith is graduating preschool, and her spiritual and academic growth will be honored in a special little family graduation ceremony at the end of this month. A heart for Jesus is the most precious possible outcome of preschool for our little ones!!! (See more about graduation at the end of this post)

2015-2016 Preschool – 2nd Grade

Fun Theme: Bugs and Butterflies

Seasonal Theme: Spring and Mothers Day

Character/Habit: Encouragement, Praise and Worship, Study the Gospel message

Bible: 2 Kings

History/Geography: Ancient Greece, Middle East

Nature Study: Ponds and Streams

Parent Study:

Nature Journal, Prayer Journal, and reading.

 

Art, Music, and Poetry Study:

All Things Bright and Beautiful Blog and picture study from Noah’s Ark book

 

Character/Habit Development:

Wisdom and the Millers: Proverbs for Children | Main photo (Cover)

Read Wisdom and the Millers: Pleasant Words p.97 and The Multitude of Words p.27

Review Stewardship Street memory verses that go with each of the 7 categories of savings, and review the “Go to the ant checklist” poster by Doorposts together. Refine work habits and servant attitude, offer opportunities for initiative and choice (like Observe and Serve). Pay Noah (7) in dimes and Faith (5) in stickers once a week (a natural math opportunity).

Have Noah study and write out related verses from his Child Training Bible and Child Virtue Bible (Child Study Bible– also see “Bible” section below) as training opportunities arise in his behavior.

 

Circle Time/Family Time:

Promise and Blessing Time: Use God’s promise in Psalm 103 to command our souls to praise the Lord:Bless the Lord, O my soul, and all that is within me, bless His holy name!” Also take a minute in circle time to verbally build our children up with spoken blessings.

  • Awesome praise! God inhabits your praise!
  • God delights in the sound of your voice _______.
  • You are doing damage to the kingdom of the enemy with your mighty weapon of praise!
  • _______’s worship in spirit and in truth is beautiful.
  • God loves your joyful noise!

Prayer Time:

Discussion Time:

  • Choose one person a day to go in the middle of our encouragement circle so that everyone else can speak lovely, thoughtful, personalized words of encouragement over that person’s life. Write them down as they are spoken and make keepsakes out of them.
  • Take a few moments to share verbally (and/or with a hand drawn picture) how we each have been blessed during this school year; rejoice in God’s goodness.
  • Bless and pray over each other’s futures as graduation approaches
  • Why do we worship? God is worthy. (Psalm 18:3, Psalm 33:1, Psalm 96:7-9, Psalm 145:3, Philippians 2:9-11) We were created to worship. (1 Peter 2:9, Romans 12:1, 1 Corinthians 10:31, Revelation 7:9-12)
  • How do we worship? In spirit and truth. (John 4:23-24, Psalm 95:1-7)
  • Read out Psalms of praise such as 8, 29, 34, 40, 63, 92, 103, and 147 on various days.
  • Teach and practice commanding our souls to praise the Lord no matter how we feel. (see intro at top of this lesson plan)
  • Teach the children about the different ways people praised and worshiped God in the Bible. Let them know that there are many ways to express our thanksgiving and love towards God. The following are a few examples and scriptures that talk about praise and worship in the Bible:

TOWDAH- TO SACRIFICE – Psalms 50:23 YADAH-

TO LIFT YOUR HANDS- 2 Chronicles 20:19-21

BARAK- TO KNEEL OR BOW – Psalms 95:6

SHABACH- TO SHOUT – Ezra 3:11

ZAMAR- TO PLAY AN INSTRUMENT – Psalms 150/1 Chron. 15:16

HALAL – TO RAVE AND BOAST – Psalms 44:8

TEHILLAH- SINGING IN THE SPIRIT – Psalm 22:3

  • Focus on growing in/practicing some of our more neglected areas of praise listed above
  • Let the Spirit move and allow children to minister. Let children share by asking them what they are thinking, feeling, hearing, or seeing. (My kids love to say what they are picturing when I ask.) Write down what they say or sing or see as the Spirit gives it.
  • Practice waiting silently in His presence. “Be still and know that I am God.”
  • When we are faced with hard times and tough issues that are beyond our control, instead of grumbling and complaining or being anxious, which hinders us from entering into God’s presence and steals our peace and joy, our goal is to learn to choose to rejoice in the Lord and enter into praise and worship. Make a list of complaints. Praise with all our might. Tear up the list when we feel that God has taken our burdens and heaviness has lifted.

Bible:

  • Early Morning: Personal time in a variety of Bibles and Bible Storybooks, Leading Little Ones to God Devotional together or a NT excerpt from mommy’s Bible
  • School: Read and narrate chapters from my ESV Study Bible (about 2 chapters a day, 3x a week)
  • Afternoon Quiet Time: Read at pleasure in our Child’s Study Bible tabbed on various topics; Draw and write in Prayer Journals
  • Night: Family Bible study led by daddy 3x a week

Leading Little Ones to God BB01

Memory Verses:

Proverbs 25:11 A word fitly spoken is like apples of gold in a setting of silver.
Proverbs 16:24 Pleasant words are as an honeycomb, sweet to the soul, and health to the bones.

  • Review May verses from previous years:
    • Psalm 103:1-5 Bless the Lord, O my soul, and all that is within me, bless his holy name! Bless the Lord, O my soul, and forget not all his benefits, who forgives all your iniquity, who heals all your diseases, who redeems your life from the pit, who crowns you with steadfast love and mercy, who satisfies you with good so that your youth is renewed like the eagle’s.
    • “My heart leaps for joy and with my song I praise Him. ” Psalms 28:7
    • “…the joy of the Lord is your strength.” Nehemiah 8:10
    • “The LORD bless you and keep you; the LORD make his face shine upon you and be gracious to you; the LORD turn his face toward you and give you peace.” Numbers 6:24-26

Hymns:

Lovely hymns are full of more truth than many sermons (2nd and 3rd verses are often especially theologically deep), and can imprint precious truths on our hearts.

Holy, Holy, Holy!
Sheet Music Here

Revisit many hymns in our hymn book that we have learned over the years

Poetry Recitation:

Let children pick their favorite stanzas to memorize.

Her Words

by Anna Hempstead Branch

My mother has the prettiest tricks
Of words and words and words.
Her talk comes out as smooth and sleek
As breasts of singing birds.

She shapes her speech all silver fine
Because she loves it so.
And her own eyes begin to shine
To hear her stories grow.

And if she goes to make a call
Or out to take a walk
We leave our work when she returns
And run to hear her talk.

We had not dreamed these things were so
Of sorrow and of mirth.
Her speech is as a thousand eyes
Through which we see the earth.

God wove a web of loveliness,
Of clouds and stars and birds,
But made not any thing at all
So beautiful as words.

They shine around our simple earth
With golden shadowings,
And every common thing they touch
Is exquisite with wings.

There’s nothing poor and nothing small
But is made fair with them.
They are the hands of living faith
That touch the garment’s hem.

They are as fair as bloom or air,
They shine like any star,
And I am rich who learned from her
How beautiful they are.

Handwriting:

  • Writing for Real Life: Mother’s Day cards, birthday cards, thank you cards, shopping lists, nature journal entries, prayer journal entries, All About Me book, spelling words, poem, or memory verse.
  • Hand write new reading words from Delightful Reading curriculum. (Faith)
  • 3 lessons a week in Print to Cursive. (Noah)

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Spelling (Noah):

Noah will study, word build, hand write, and recite the spelling of all the new reading words from one story a week. We don’t use the Pathway Series readers as readers, but rather as a fun way to provide the words for our spelling. We love the sweet stories in these books.

the wooden letters Noah and Faith use for word building (spelling)

Reading: (Faith)

Materials:  printed scripture verse, loose letters, word cards for “Cast but a glance at riches, and they are gone, for they will surely sprout wings and fly like an eagle.” Proverbs 23:4-5 

Do not wear yourself out trying to get rich; have the wisdom to show restraint. Cast but a glance at riches, and they are gone, for they will surely sprout wings and fly like an eagle. Proverbs 23:4-5

.

Reading Lessons:
“Cast but a glance at riches, and they are gone, for they will surely sprout wings and fly like an eagle.”

1. Write one word from the selection on the board

2. Discuss the word

3. Study it closely, then erase

4. Find the word card from a small pile of cards, then hide the card

5. Spell the word with loose letters (from memory if possible)

6. Find the word in the printed fable

7. Repeat steps 1-6 with each word

8. Do a review of all the words listed up on the board

Word Building Lessons (spelling):

Using loose letters, build words that rhyme with each of the words assigned for this month (ex: not–cot, dot, got, jot, let, pot, blot, plot, knot, trot, spot, etc.).

(3rd reading selection, lessons 5-8 in Delightful Reading by Simply Charlotte Mason)

Vocabulary:

Most will be learned naturally in conversation as words in question arise, but Noah also looks up 1 word a week (and writes the definition in a notebook) to learn dictionary skills and spur his love for new words.

Webster's American Dictionary of the English Language, 1828 Edition - By: Noah Webster

Literature Read Alouds:

Insect fables, like The Grasshopper and the Ants, in:

History and Geography:

  • SCM’s Joshua-Malachi & Ancient Greece lesson plan book includes 1 chapter a week from a living book and 4 chapters a week from the spine (Bible portion is mentioned above). Noah will either narrate readings orally or narrate in his history sketchbook with a drawing of what he remembers.

Joshua through Malachi & Ancient Greece.  https://i1.wp.com/www.nothingnewpress.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/03/greeks-cover-600x400.jpg

  • One lesson a week from SCM’s Visits to the Middle East lesson plan book
  • Pray for the country of the week (as selected in the lesson plan book) using the prayer points in Window on the World

  • We will also do a few lessons from Home Geography

Math:

Lessons are from Kathy Richardson’s math books and AL Math Card Games:

Understanding Geometry Book

Exploration Time: In the morning just before school, provide pattern blocks, unifix cubes, building blocks, tangrams, geoboards, tiles, pattern blocks, etc. for free exploration of math materials. What can you do with these materials? What did you notice? What did you have to do in order to make it? Try to observe while they are working, and sometimes make a comment about what you observe. When children need a suggestion ask, “I wonder if….” or “Do you think it would work to….?” or “Do you have another idea?,” so that they feel free to decide on their own.

Ongoing Review: Spend a few minutes once a week during math lessons to practice instant recognition of number combinations. Use homemade “flashcards” with arrangements of items that can be counted (like toothpicks or buttons that can be grouped into two numbers upon closer inspection in order to quickly find the total). Hold up a card and say, “Tell me fast. How many?” Sometimes ask, “How did you know?” (Cause there is a four and a three, and that’s seven) When recognizing groups of more than five easily, child will have to mentally combine the smaller groups that make up the larger ones.

.

 .

.

Geometry:

Copy Cat (p.19) Children create structures out of provided or self-selected math materials and their partners copy them. For preschoolers, have their partner add just one block at a time as they copy if you see that they are struggling.

Recording Designs and Creations (p.22)

  • Pattern blocks: Record a pattern block design with pattern block paper shapes or triangle grid paper (for extra challenge). The challenge is in the reproduction. Provide a paper to build upon to control complexity–smaller paper for easier designs, bigger paper for more challenging designs.
  • Tiles: Record with colored paper squares.
  • Geoboards: Record on another geoboard (easier), onto same size geoboard paper (hard), onto smaller geoboard paper (harder), or onto plain paper (hardest). Ask children what they see in their design (“I see a trapezoid, a square, and a rectangle.”)

Noah’s Lessons:

  • Make a freedom quilt pattern out of pattern blocks
  • Book #3 by Kathy Richardson–pages 36-47.
  • Review Noah’s handmade subtraction book
  • Make fact family houses

IMG_0067

Games:

  • Subtraction with Skillball
  • Telling Time tell time with clock cards, clock face and hands print out
  • Money set out an amount of money in quarters, have Noah exchange it for dimes and nickels and vice versa
  • Use place value cards to add and subtract

Faith’s Lessons:

Week 1  Line Puzzles

Have children guess how many unifix cubes will fit on each line and then check and see how close their guess was. Have children compare two of the puzzles and write a number sentence such as “5 is less than 7”.

Week 2 Comparing Volume

Have children discover which of two different sized containers holds more manipulatives (of the same size), and which holds less. Write a number sentence. Extension: compare the volume of three containers and put them in order from most to least. Use smaller counters to work with larger numbers.

Week 3 Recording Designs and Creations (p.158)
Children will focus on shape and position by making a design and copying it. Have the children create a simple design with pattern blocks or tiles. Then have the children copy these designs by gluing down paper shapes that match the blocks (you can print “printable pattern block shapes from the internet” and cut them out before hand). The copying portion of the activity is important because reproduction requires children to pay close attention to the position of the blocks relative to each other and the number being used. Limit the number of blocks you give them if needed because it is easier for them to build than it is to copy.

Week 4 More or Less (p. 148)

Object: To compare a group of objects to determine which group has more and which has less. This is a game that can be played by two children, or you and a child. Use the number set cards from the two previous lessons, and create a More/Less spinner (use a spinner you already own, cover one half with paper labeled “More” and one half with paper labeled “Less”). Have each partner draw a card out of the pile of number set cards. One partner spins the More/Less spinner. If it lands on “More,” the partner whose card has more wins and takes both cards. If it lands on “Less,” the partner whose card has less on it wins and takes both cards. Play continues until they run out of cards. Are the children able to tell immediately which is more or which is less, or do they need to count?

Nature Study:

IMG_0297IMG_0306IMG_0308

Videos:

Reading Rainbow, Moody Science Classics, BBC’s Planet nature shows are what we rotate through at Family Movie Night on Fun Friday. We love all 3!

READING RAINBOW:DESERT LIFE

Traditions, Fun Friday Projects, and Other Ideas:

Use the book Bugs to draw some detailed pictures of insects in our nature journals, especially ones we find in nature

 A sweet Mother’s Day card idea-kissing fish hand prints
Easy (& cute) Handprint Fish
 
 Paint Butterflies
IMG_0323Pick Cherries

 Hand Raise a Butterfly

 
 
 Kids help and plan a Mother’s Day Tea
 IMG_0559
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
The kids love to do color mixing every year, and then make lots of paintings to help decorate the house for graduation
 

 
 Faithy is graduating preschool!!! We will make sure to mark it and celebrate it with something heartfelt, ceremonial, and purposeful. A few years ago for Noah and Tayler, we had a very very sweet Graduation Send Off. It was an identity affirming “rite of passage” type celebration to prophetically call our little ones into the next stage of their life, and to speak words of blessing over them. The growth in maturity that had been called forth in that season for Noah, came in pretty dramatically. At Faith’s graduation, she will have an opportunity to show her growth in academic and spiritual training, and be applauded! Our other older children may have a public speaking opportunity as well to bless Faith and share about the school year. Graduation from preschool marks the beginning of an important training period for children–a 10 or so year period for training in Christian manhood or womanhood, to one day become a mature disciple of Jesus. See an example of training with measurable objectives: A Rite of Passage: Training Your Son for Christian Manhood.

 

 Requests for the Last Day of School: swimming, popsicles, and tye dying t-shirts!
Berry Bliss Rocket Popsicles | recipe on FamilyFreshCooking.com

Fieldtrips:

  • The butterfly garden at Coyote Hills Regional Park and/or The Bird and Butterfly Festival there
  • The creek at Round Valley Creek
  • Check in on the newt eggs at Briones

 

Leave a comment »

April Lesson Plans

2015-2016 Preschool – 2nd Grade

Fun Theme: Farming

Seasonal Theme: Spring

Character/Habit: Truthful, self controlled, Study the Gospel message

Bible: 2 Kings

History/Geography: Ancient Greece, Middle East

Nature Study: Ponds and Streams

Parent Study:

Nature Journal, Prayer Journal, and reading.

 

Art, Music, and Poetry Study:

All Things Bright and Beautiful Blog and picture study from Noah’s Ark book

 

Character/Habit Development:

Wisdom and the Millers: Proverbs for Children | Main photo (Cover)

Read Wisdom and the Millers: Better than the Mighty p.101, The Lip of Truth p.62, and Whoso Confesseth p.139

Review Stewardship Street memory verses that go with each of the 7 categories of savings, and review the “Go to the ant checklist” poster by Doorposts together. Refine work habits and servant attitude, offer opportunities for initiative and choice (like Observe and Serve). Pay Noah (7) in dimes and Faith (5) in stickers once a week (a natural math opportunity).

Have Noah study and write out related verses from his Child Training Bible and Child Virtue Bible (Child Study Bible– also see “Bible” section below) as training opportunities arise in his behavior.

 

Circle Time/Family Time:

Promise and Blessing Time:

Use God’s promise in Psalm 15:1-2 as a confession to speak daily over each other:Lord, _____ will dwell in Your sanctuary. _____will live on Your holy hill. ______ whose walk is blameless and who does what is righteous, who speaks the truth from his/her/my heart”

Also take a minute in circle time to verbally build our children up with spoken blessings.

  • I know ________ is honest. He/she is a boy/girl who tells the truth.
  • Even when it is hard to be honest, ________ is.
  • I know that I can trust what ________ says. He/she is careful to tell the truth.
  • There is no question in my mind. I know what ________ says is the truth.
  • God delights in you ________, when you tell the truth and so do I.
  • ________ can be trusted to tell the truth.

(With each bullet above, try to include specific examples of obedience observed of each child as well)

Prayer Time:

  • Use Instructions in Righteousness by Doorposts to help identify and attack dishonesty. Instructions for Righteousness offers scriptural ideas for rewards for truthfulness, and punishments for lying.

Discussion Time:

  • “The measure of a man’s real character is what he would do if he knew he would never be found out.” – Macaulay
  • What honesty did for Abraham Lincoln
  • The Boy and the Robbers. State facts carefully and exactly, with out exaggeration or leaving anything out.
  • The Shepherd Boy and the Wolf
  • The leap at Rhodes
  • Honesty is Best from Harper’s Third Reader
  • An Honest Kid
  • Honest Scales
  • Pure Truth
  • Traveling Tales and Tails
  • Truth Champions
  • Certificate of Authenticity
  • Have one child tell a second child a message. Have the second child report the message to me. I will write down the message and then check with the first child if the messenger reported accurately. We think of lying as intentional deception, but it can also happen through a careless effort to state the facts. Truthfulness requires careful listening and delivering of the facts.
  • Your friend tells you he caught a whale yesterday when he went fishing; you go to his house for dinner and his family serves you trout–the big catch. Your friend whispers to you when his mom is around and might not like what he is saying. When he says he will meet up with you in 10 minutes, he is there in 15 or 20. He says he likes to play with you best of all, but when other friends on the street get a new toy, his plans change and he goes to play at their house. Your friend tells you that you are his best friend in the whole world. How does his words and actions make you feel about that statement? How can being truthful make us a better friend? “When regard for truth has been broken down or even slightly weakened, all things will remain doubtful.” –St. Augustine
  • “The most dangerous untruths are truths moderately distorted.” Georg Christoph Lichtenberg

Bible:

  • Early Morning: Personal time in a variety of Bibles and Bible Storybooks, Leading Little Ones to God Devotional together or a NT excerpt from mommy’s Bible
  • School: Read and narrate chapters from my ESV Study Bible (about 2 chapters a day, 3x a week)
  • Afternoon Quiet Time: Read at pleasure in our Child’s Study Bible tabbed on various topics; Draw and write in Prayer Journals
  • Night: Family Bible study led by daddy 3x a week

Leading Little Ones to God BB01

Memory Verses:

1 Peter 5:8 “Be self-controlled and alert. Your enemy the devil prowls around looking for someone to devour.”

  • Review April verses from previous years:
    •  1 Peter 3:10 “For, ‘Whoever would love life and see good days must keep his tongue from evil and his lips from deceitful speech.’ ”
    • “I have been crucified with Christ and I no longer live, but Christ lives in me..” Galatians 2:20
    • “Now faith is the substance of things hoped for, the evidence of things not seen.” Hebrews 11:1
    • “I am the resurrection and the life. He who believes in Me, though he may die, he shall live. And whoever lives and believes in Me shall never die.” John 11:25-26

Hymns:

Lovely hymns are full of more truth than many sermons (2nd and 3rd verses are often especially theologically deep), and can imprint precious truths on our hearts.

Holy, Holy, Holy!
Sheet Music Here

Poetry Recitation:

IMG_1459

 

Handwriting:

  • Writing for Real Life: Birthday cards, thank you cards, shopping lists, nature journal entries, prayer journal entries, All About Me book, spelling words, poem, or memory verse.
  • Hand write new reading words from Delightful Reading curriculum. (Faith)
  • 3 lessons a week in Print to Cursive. (Noah)

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Spelling (Noah):

Noah will study, word build, hand write, and recite the spelling of all the new reading words from one story a week. We don’t use the Pathway Series readers as readers, but rather as a fun way to provide the words for our spelling. We love the sweet stories in these books.

the wooden letters Noah and Faith use for word building (spelling)

Reading: (Faith)

Materials:  printed scripture verse, loose letters, word cards for “Cast but a glance at riches, and they are gone, for they will surely sprout wings and fly like an eagle.” Proverbs 23:4-5 

Do not wear yourself out trying to get rich; have the wisdom to show restraint. Cast but a glance at riches, and they are gone, for they will surely sprout wings and fly like an eagle. Proverbs 23:4-5

.

Reading Lessons:
“Cast but a glance at riches, and they are gone, for they will surely sprout wings and fly like an eagle.”

1. Write one word from the selection on the board

2. Discuss the word

3. Study it closely, then erase

4. Find the word card from a small pile of cards, then hide the card

5. Spell the word with loose letters (from memory if possible)

6. Find the word in the printed fable

7. Repeat steps 1-6 with each word

8. Do a review of all the words listed up on the board

Word Building Lessons (spelling):

Using loose letters, build words that rhyme with each of the words assigned for this month (ex: not–cot, dot, got, jot, let, pot, blot, plot, knot, trot, spot, etc.).

(3rd reading selection, lessons 5-8 in Delightful Reading by Simply Charlotte Mason)

Vocabulary:

Most will be learned naturally in conversation as words in question arise, but Noah also looks up 1 word a week (and writes the definition in a notebook) to learn dictionary skills and spur his love for new words.

Webster's American Dictionary of the English Language, 1828 Edition - By: Noah Webster

Literature Read Alouds:

https://i2.wp.com/ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51EOV4pNaVL._SX385_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg

History and Geography:

  • SCM’s Joshua-Malachi & Ancient Greece lesson plan book includes 1 chapter a week from a living book and 4 chapters a week from the spine (Bible portion is mentioned above). Noah will either narrate readings orally or narrate in his history sketchbook with a drawing of what he remembers.

Joshua through Malachi & Ancient Greece.  https://i1.wp.com/www.nothingnewpress.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/03/greeks-cover-600x400.jpg

  • One lesson a week from SCM’s Visits to the Middle East lesson plan book
  • Pray for the country of the week (as selected in the lesson plan book) using the prayer points in Window on the World

  • We will also do a few lessons from Home Geography

Math:

Lessons are from Kathy Richardson’s math books and AL Math Card Games:

Understanding Geometry Book

Exploration Time: In the morning just before school, provide pattern blocks, unifix cubes, building blocks, tangrams, geoboards, tiles, pattern blocks, etc. for free exploration of math materials. What can you do with these materials? What did you notice? What did you have to do in order to make it? Try to observe while they are working, and sometimes make a comment about what you observe. When children need a suggestion ask, “I wonder if….” or “Do you think it would work to….?” or “Do you have another idea?,” so that they feel free to decide on their own.

Ongoing Review: Spend a few minutes once a week during math lessons to practice instant recognition of number combinations. Use homemade “flashcards” with arrangements of items that can be counted (like toothpicks or buttons that can be grouped into two numbers upon closer inspection in order to quickly find the total). Hold up a card and say, “Tell me fast. How many?” Sometimes ask, “How did you know?” (Cause there is a four and a three, and that’s seven) When recognizing groups of more than five easily, child will have to mentally combine the smaller groups that make up the larger ones.

.

 .

.

Geometry:

Copy Cat (p.19) Children create structures out of provided or self-selected math materials and their partners copy them. For preschoolers, have their partner add just one block at a time as they copy if you see that they are struggling.

Recording Designs and Creations (p.22)

  • Pattern blocks: Record a pattern block design with pattern block paper shapes or triangle grid paper (for extra challenge). The challenge is in the reproduction. Provide a paper to build upon to control complexity–smaller paper for easier designs, bigger paper for more challenging designs.
  • Tiles: Record with colored paper squares.
  • Geoboards: Record on another geoboard (easier), onto same size geoboard paper (hard), onto smaller geoboard paper (harder), or onto plain paper (hardest). Ask children what they see in their design (“I see a trapezoid, a square, and a rectangle.”)

Noah’s Lessons:

  • Make a freedom quilt pattern out of pattern blocks
  • Place Value lessons in Book #3 by Kathy Richardson–learning to regroup by 10’s.
  • Review Noah’s handmade subtraction book
  • Make fact family houses

IMG_0067

Games:

  • Telling Time tell time with clock cards, clock face and hands print out
  • Money set out an amount of money in quarters, have Noah exchange it for dimes and nickels and vice versa
  • To One Hundred (p. 26) Make a stock pile of 5’s and 10’s cards. Player take the top card and enters that number of beads on his abacus. Players take turns adding by 5’s and 10’s until someone reaches 100 exactly. Variation: Use a hundreds chart instead of an abacus.
  • Addition War (p. 39) Using about 40 1-9 numeral cards, deal the cards out evenly. Players take the top two cards from their stacks, set them face up, add them together, and say the sum aloud. The player with the higher sum takes all four cards. Equal sums means war and each player places two extra cards face down, and then places two more face up to add together. The higher sum takes all the cards.
  • Showing a Number On Various Manipulatives Use an abacus, place value cards, unifix cubes, and a hundreds chart to show a number like 37 or 56 or 94 on various manipulatives.
  • Corners (p.29) Practice sums totaling a multiple of 5 with Corners Cards
  • Go to the Dump (p.24) Repetition for memorizing facts to 10 (addition and subtraction)

Faith’s Lessons:

Week 1  Sorting More or Less (p. 149)

Children will determine whether groups of objects have more or less than the group they are being compared to. String different numbers of beads on pieces of yarn and tie both ends off (or use any number set material like toothpick, button, or paper clip cards as mentioned in previous lesson plan posts). Provide one sheet of paper labeled “Less” and one sheet labeled “More”. Lay the sheets of paper side by side and choose one of the strings of beads to lay in between the sheets. Now the children will pick up strings of beads on at a time from a pile and compare whether its more or less than the chosen string. If it has more beads, it goes on the “More” sheet; if it has less beads, it goes on the “Less” sheet. If its the same, place it in between the sheets with the original string. Ask, “What have you found out so far?” and “Can you tell me which numbers are more/less than ____?

Week 2 Recording Designs and Creations (p.158)
Children will focus on shape and position by making a design and copying it. Have the children create a simple design with pattern blocks or tiles. Then have the children copy these designs by gluing down paper shapes that match the blocks (you can print “printable pattern block shapes from the internet” and cut them out before hand). The copying portion of the activity is important because reproduction requires children to pay close attention to the position of the blocks relative to each other and the number being used. Limit the number of blocks you give them if needed because it is easier for them to build than it is to copy.

Week 3 Counting Boards: Changing Numbers (p. 173)

Children will practice changing one number of objects to another. First, lay out several duplicate storyboards (several sheets of paper with a simple picture of a two lane road for example where unifix cubes represent cars driving down the road). Place a different number of “cars” driving down the road on each storyboard. Have children label each picture with the correct numeral (either write numbers on a small squares of paper or use numeral cards). Leave the cubes in place, and have children remove the number cards, mix them up, and put each in a different position than before. Now the cubes do not match their number labels. Children now adjust the number of cubes on the boards to match the newly placed numbers

Nature Study:

IMG_0297IMG_0306IMG_0308

Videos:

Reading Rainbow, Moody Science Classics, BBC’s Planet nature shows are what we rotate through at Family Movie Night on Fun Friday. We love all 3!

READING RAINBOW:DESERT LIFE

Traditions, Fun Friday Projects, and Other Ideas:

Plant and Paint Sunflowers–We do a ‘Directed Painting’ every year (As I paint on my paper and talk the kids through, they try to copy)

IMG_9978

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Farm Painting
Make some frontier food
 
 
10-Minute Homemade Butter

 

Truck art

Fieldtrips:

  • Nature Grubs Class April 13th–Wildflowers
  • Look for tadpoles at Round Valley Creek
  • Check in on the newt eggs at Briones
Leave a comment »

March Lesson Plans

2015-2016 Preschool – 2nd Grade

Fun Theme: Easter

Seasonal Theme: Spring

Character/Habit:

Helpful, Useful, Productive, Hardworking, Good Steward, Responsible

Bible: 1 Kings

History/Geography: Ancient Greece, Middle East

Nature Study: Ponds and Streams

Parent Study:

Nature Journal, Prayer Journal, and reading.

 

Art, Music, and Poetry Study:

All Things Bright and Beautiful Blog and picture study from Noah’s Ark book

 

Character/Habit Development:

Wisdom and the Millers: Proverbs for Children | Main photo (Cover)

Read Wisdom and the Millers: Go to the Ant p.17 and The Righteous Mans Beast p.55

Review Stewardship Street memory verses that go with each of the 7 categories of savings, and review the “Go to the ant checklist” poster by Doorposts together. Refine work habits and servant attitude, offer opportunities for initiative and choice (like Observe and Serve). Pay Noah (7) in dimes and Faith (5) in stickers once a week (a natural math opportunity).

Have Noah study and write out related verses from his Child Training Bible and Child Virtue Bible (Child Study Bible– also see “Bible” section below) as training opportunities arise in his behavior.

 

Circle Time/Family Time:

Promise and Blessing Time:

Use God’s promise in Philippians 2:14-16 to confess regularly over each other:Do everything without complaining or arguing so that you may be blameless and innocent, God’s children without any faults among a crooked and perverse generation, among whom you shine like stars in the world  as you hold firmly to the word of life.”

Also take a minute in circle time to verbally build our children up with spoken blessings.

  • Awesome job, ________! You are persisting in doing good!
  • It makes us feel so good to work hard and finish a big job.
  • I noticed you have been a faithful steward over  ___________.
  • You are such a big help in this family!
  • You are shining like a star in the universe as you serve without complaining.

(With each bullet above, try to include specific examples of obedience observed of each child as well)

Prayer Time:

  • Today, repent. Be aware of the sins that crucified Him. Write them down…..ingratitude, unbelief, envy, pride. Feel your need for a Savior. Burn up the confessions. Feel the emancipation of salvation. You are dead to the old you. Know that your sins are no more. You are a new creation.

 Discussion Time:

  • Use Helper Assessment periodically throughout the month
  • Who can you help? What could you help with when you were younger? What can you help with now that you are bigger? Share memorials of God’s goodness (pictures, slideshow, or movie of little helpers helping out through the years).
  • The Ants and the Grasshopper “Go to the ant, thou sluggard; consider her ways, and be wise.” Proverbs 6:6
  • Work While You Work “And whatsoever ye do, do it heartily, as to the Lord, and not unto men;” Colossians 3:23, “No man can serve two masters.” Matthew 6:24
  • Dust Under the Rug “He that is faithful in that which is least is faithful also in much.” Luke 16:10
  • The Week of Sundays “He that loveth pleasure shall be a poor man; he that loveth wine and oil shall not be rich.” Proverbs 21:17
  • The Sheep and the Pig (contrast with the Little Red Hen) “Two are better than one, because they have a good reward for their toil. For if they fall, one will lift up his fellow. But woe to him who is alone when he falls and has not another to lift him up!” Ecclesiastes 4:9-12
  • Which Loved Best? “Let us not love in word or tongue, but in deed and in truth” 1 John 3:18
  • Beautiful Hands “Whatsoever thy hand findeth to do, do it with all thy might.” Ecclesiastes 9:10
  • RebeccaThere is nothing better for a man, than that he should eat and drink, and that he should make his soul enjoy good in his labor. This also I saw, that it was from the hand of God.” Ecclesiastes 2:24
  • King Alfred and the Cakes (scroll up a few pages) “Moreover it is required in stewards, that a man be found faithful.” 1 Corinthians 4:2
  • For Want of a Horseshoe Nail (little duties neglected bring great downfalls)
  • The Husband who was to Mind the House (respect the hard work others do) “But we request of you, brethren, that you appreciate those who diligently labor among you, (especially those who have charge over you in the Lord and give you instruction!), and that you esteem them very highly in love because of their work. Live in peace with one another.” 1 Thessalonians 5:12-13
  • Mother Holly Do you only work if you know there will be a reward? “It is more blessed to give than to receive.” Acts 20:35
  • Do all the good you can, by all the means you can, in all the ways you can, to all the people you can, as long as you ever can.” –John Wesley

Bible:

  • Early Morning: Personal time in a variety of Bibles and Bible Storybooks, Leading Little Ones to God Devotional together or a NT excerpt from mommy’s Bible
  • School: Read and narrate chapters from my ESV Study Bible (about 2 chapters a day, 3x a week)
  • Afternoon Quiet Time: Read at pleasure in our Child’s Study Bible tabbed on various topics; Draw and write in Prayer Journals
  • Night: Family Bible study led by daddy 3x a week

Leading Little Ones to God BB01

Memory Verses:

Keep your life free from love of money, and be content with what you have, for he has said, “I will never leave you nor forsake you.” Hebrew 13:5

1 Timothy 6:6-10 (to read, not memorize)

Review March verses from previous years:

  • “Children obey your parents in the Lord: for this is right.” Ephesians 6:1
  • “Whoever scorns instruction will pay for it, but whoever respects a command is rewarded.” Proverbs 13:13
  • “And whatsoever ye do, do it heartily, as to the Lord, and not unto men.” Colossians 3:23

Hymns:

Lovely hymns are full of more truth than many sermons (2nd and 3rd verses are often especially theologically deep), and can imprint precious truths on our hearts.

When I Survey the Wondrous Cross

Sheet Music

We add in Chris Tomlin’s chorus:

Oh the wonderful Cross, oh the wonderful Cross
Bids me come and die and find that I may truly live
Oh the wonderful Cross, oh the wonderful Cross
All who gather here by grace, draw near and bless Your name

Christ the Lord is Risen Today

Sheet Music

Amazing Grace
Sheet Music Here

Poetry Recitation:

First two stanzas of “Daffodils” by William Wordsworth

IMG_1475

 

Handwriting:

  • Writing for Real Life: Birthday cards, thank you cards, shopping lists, nature journal entries, prayer journal entries, All About Me book, spelling words, poem, or memory verse.
  • Hand write new reading words from Delightful Reading curriculum. (Faith)
  • 3 lessons a week in Print to Cursive. (Noah)

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Spelling (Noah):

Noah will study, word build, hand write, and recite the spelling of all the new reading words from one story a week. We don’t use the Pathway Series readers as readers, but rather as a fun way to provide the words for our spelling. We love the sweet stories in these books.

the wooden letters Noah and Faith use for word building (spelling)

Reading: (Faith)

Materials:  printed fable, loose letters, word cards for “that his claws were stronger than your teeth. Moral: It is easy to kick a man that is down.”

.

The Dogs and the Fox

By Aesop 

Some dogs, finding the skin of a lion, began to tear it in pieces with their teeth. A Fox, seeing them, said, “If this lion were alive, you would soon find out that his claws were stronger than your teeth.”

Moral: It is easy to kick a man that is down.


Reading Lessons:
“Moral: It is easy to kick a man that is down.”

1. Write one word from the selection on the board

2. Discuss the word

3. Study it closely, then erase

4. Find the word card from a small pile of cards, then hide the card

5. Spell the word with loose letters (from memory if possible)

6. Find the word in the printed fable

7. Repeat steps 1-6 with each word

8. Do a review of all the words listed up on the board

Word Building Lessons (spelling):

Using loose letters, build words that rhyme with each of the words assigned for this month (ex: claws–jaws, paws, laws, straws, gnaws, thaws, draws, etc.).

(Lessons 13-14 in Delightful Reading by Simply Charlotte Mason)

Vocabulary:

Most will be learned naturally in conversation as words in question arise, but Noah also looks up 1 word a week (and writes the definition in a notebook) to learn dictionary skills and spur his love for new words.

Webster's American Dictionary of the English Language, 1828 Edition - By: Noah Webster

Literature Read Alouds:

 

Illustrated Hedge of Thorns, TheIllustrated True Princess, The

Bird's Nest, The

History and Geography:

  • SCM’s Joshua-Malachi & Ancient Greece lesson plan book includes 1 chapter a week from a living book and 4 chapters a week from the spine (Bible portion is mentioned above). Noah will either narrate readings orally or narrate in his history sketchbook with a drawing of what he remembers.

Joshua through Malachi & Ancient Greece.  https://i1.wp.com/www.nothingnewpress.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/03/greeks-cover-600x400.jpg

  • One lesson a week from SCM’s Visits to the Middle East lesson plan book
  • Pray for the country of the week (as selected in the lesson plan book) using the prayer points in Window on the World

  • We will also do a few lessons from Home Geography

Math:

Lessons are from Kathy Richardson’s math books and AL Math Card Games:

Understanding Geometry Book

Exploration Time: In the morning just before school, provide pattern blocks, unifix cubes, building blocks, tangrams, geoboards, tiles, pattern blocks, etc. for free exploration of math materials. What can you do with these materials? What did you notice? What did you have to do in order to make it? Try to observe while they are working, and sometimes make a comment about what you observe. When children need a suggestion ask, “I wonder if….” or “Do you think it would work to….?” or “Do you have another idea?,” so that they feel free to decide on their own.

Ongoing Review: Spend a few minutes once a week during math lessons to practice instant recognition of number combinations. Use homemade “flashcards” with arrangements of items that can be counted (like toothpicks or buttons that can be grouped into two numbers upon closer inspection in order to quickly find the total). Hold up a card and say, “Tell me fast. How many?” Sometimes ask, “How did you know?” (Cause there is a four and a three, and that’s seven) When recognizing groups of more than five easily, child will have to mentally combine the smaller groups that make up the larger ones.

.

 .

.

Geometry:

Copy Cat (p.19) Children create structures out of provided or self-selected math materials and their partners copy them. For preschoolers, have their partner add just one block at a time as they copy if you see that they are struggling.

Recording Designs and Creations (p.22)

  • Pattern blocks: Record a pattern block design with pattern block paper shapes or triangle grid paper (for extra challenge). The challenge is in the reproduction. Provide a paper to build upon to control complexity–smaller paper for easier designs, bigger paper for more challenging designs.
  • Tiles: Record with colored paper squares.
  • Geoboards: Record on another geoboard (easier), onto same size geoboard paper (hard), onto smaller geoboard paper (harder), or onto plain paper (hardest). Ask children what they see in their design (“I see a trapezoid, a square, and a rectangle.”)

Noah’s Lessons:

  • Place Value lessons in Book #3 by Kathy Richardson–learning to regroup by 10’s.
  • Review Noah’s handmade subtraction book
  • Make fact family houses

IMG_0067

Games:

  • Telling Time tell time with clock cards, clock face and hands print out
  • Money set out an amount of money in quarters, have Noah exchange it for dimes and nickels and vice versa
  • To One Hundred (p. 26) Make a stock pile of 5’s and 10’s cards. Player take the top card and enters that number of beads on his abacus. Players take turns adding by 5’s and 10’s until someone reaches 100 exactly. Variation: Use a hundreds chart instead of an abacus.
  • Addition War (p. 39) Using about 40 1-9 numeral cards, deal the cards out evenly. Players take the top two cards from their stacks, set them face up, add them together, and say the sum aloud. The player with the higher sum takes all four cards. Equal sums means war and each player places two extra cards face down, and then places two more face up to add together. The higher sum takes all the cards.
  • Showing a Number On Various Manipulatives Use an abacus, place value cards, unifix cubes, and a hundreds chart to show a number like 37 or 56 or 94 on various manipulatives.
  • Corners (p.29) Practice sums totaling a multiple of 5 with Corners Cards
  • Go to the Dump (p.24) Repetition for memorizing facts to 10 (addition and subtraction)

Faith’s Lessons:

Week 1 Lets Pretend Stories (p. 105)
Provide counters (such as unifix cubes) and colored construction paper to represent different environments: ocean (blue), grass (green), cave (black). Tell a story for the children to act out (like a word problem). For example: “Its a stormy day on the ocean. The waves are high and it is starting to rain. There are four ships on the ocean. Show me the ships. Three of the ships decide to go back to the harbor…..” These pretend stories provide imaginative counting practice/ addition and subtraction practice by noticing how many are left or how many there are altogether (this step is not necessary unless children are ready).
Week 2 Pattern Task Cards (p.151)
Have children copy simple or complex patterns using pattern blocks, unifix cubes, or dot paint.
Week 3 Matching (p.146)
Make number set cards (like the toothpick set pictured in my December lesson plan) with varying objects such as buttons, paper clips, bread tags, beads on bracelets, beads strung on yarn, onjects glued on popsicle sticks. Each set should include at least 3 or 4 of each of the numbers from 1 to 10. Also provide collections of various items (buttons, keys, nuts and blots, etc) and several sheets of construction paper. Have the child choose one of the number set cards. Then, have the child use the collections and construction paper to (like a mat) to build a set that has the same number as the card. What size numbers can he work with? Does she copy the arrangement?
Week 4 Exploring at the Weighing Station (p. 61)
When children first start learning about weight, they need the type of scales that show how the weight of an object actually pull down the scale. Make homemade scales by hanging a container by a rubber band off the end of a ruler weighed down by books on the other end. Make two scales so that objects to be weighed can be compared. Say, “Which do you think is heavier–the can or the rock? Let’s find out.”

Nature Study:

IMG_0297IMG_0306IMG_0308

Videos:

Reading Rainbow, Moody Science Classics, BBC’s Planet nature shows are what we rotate through at Family Movie Night on Fun Friday. We love all 3!

READING RAINBOW:DESERT LIFE

Traditions, Fun Friday Projects, and Other Ideas:

Chalk Pastel Birds Nest

Click to insert.

100th Day Party! The Kids have been clear that they want “everything just the same as last year.”

We dot painted 100 gumballs, made 100 marshmallow toothpick structures, counted 100 pieces of rainbow colored snacks, wrote up a 100th Day News page, guesstimated the volume of 100 drops of water, and did 100 fun exercise moves with Jack Hartmann.

IMG_0181

 

Make learning some new ways to serve at home a part of the school morning this month. And make spring cleaning a family effort!

IMG_5854

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Kids looooved Psanky egg decorating last year. We used 1 fine kitska, 1 medium kitska, 5 psyanky dyes, and 1 cube of beeswax.

IMG_0452

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Plan a Family Passover Seder 

IMG_6933

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Do a Ressurection Egg Hunt

IMG_6856

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Make an Easter Garden Basket and use it during a family worship night on Good Friday. We put in a clay tomb, a cross made of sticks, symbolic objects (butterfly, birds eggs), a path, tea lights, and sometimes little woodland bunnies just for fun.

Year 1

Year 1

 

IMG_9226

Year 2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_6892

Year 3

 

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_0115

Year 4 We were able to use one of the succulents that was in Noah’s Year 1 basket. We hadn’t touched it in years, and it thrived and survived anyway. So now it has a special place in our hearts as it reminds us of little Noah and that sweet first year of homeschool.

Fieldtrips:

Leave a comment »

February Lesson Plans

2015-2016 Preschool – 2nd Grade

Fun Theme: Valentines and Friendship

Seasonal Theme: Winter

Character/Habit: Kindness and Selflessness

Bible: 2 Samuel

History/Geography: Ancient Greece, Middle East

Nature Study: Ponds and Streams

Parent Study:

Nature Journal, Prayer Journal, and reading.

 

Art, Music, and Poetry Study:

All Things Bright and Beautiful Blog and picture study from Noah’s Ark book

 

Character/Habit Development:

Wisdom and the Millers: Proverbs for Children | Main photo (Cover)

Read Wisdom and the Millers: Pleasant Words p.97 and Envying Sinners p.121

Review Stewardship Street memory verses that go with each of the 7 categories of savings, and review the “Go to the ant checklist” poster by Doorposts together. Refine work habits and servant attitude, offer opportunities for initiative and choice (like Observe and Serve). Pay Noah (6) in dimes and Faith (5) in stickers once a week (a natural math opportunity).

Have Noah study and write out related verses from his Child Training Bible and Child Virtue Bible (Child Study Bible– also see “Bible” section below)

 

Circle Time/Family Time:

Promise and Blessing Time:

Use God’s promise in Ephesians 4:29 to confess regularly over each other: “Let no corrupting talk come out of _____‘s mouth, but only such as is good for building up, as fits the occasion, that it may give grace to those who hear.” Also take a minute in circle time to verbally build our children up with spoken blessings.

  • You have such a kind heart, ________.
  • Thank you for thinking of ________ (name the recipient of your child’s kindness), instead of yourself, ________.
  • Did you know God delights when He sees kindness (Jeremiah 9:24)? I bet He is happy right now.
  • ________, thank you for choosing not to pay back wrong for wrong.

(With each bullet above, try to include specific examples of obedience observed of each child as well)

Prayer Time:

  • Use scripture guided parent’s prayers and kid’s prayers to intercede for God’s help in the area of kindness
  • Use Instructions in Righteousness by Doorposts to help identify and attack selfishness and contention–two major roadblocks in siblings forming true friendship–using scripture. Also offers scriptural ideas for  rewards for generosity and peace making, and punishments for selfishness and arguing.

 Discussion Time:

  • Definitions: Kindness–friendly regard shown toward another, Courtesy–behavior marked by respect for and consideration of others, Manners–social rules of conduct shown in the prevalent customs
  • “No kind action ever stops with itself. One kind action leads to another. Good example is followed. A single act of kindness throws out roots in all directions, and the roots spring up and make new trees. The greatest work that kindness does to others is that it makes them kind themselves.” –Amelia Earhart
  • This would be a great month to get familiar with the booklet, “The Brother-offended Checklist,” by Doorposts, and post its corresponding chart in the house.

  • “A young man should be more polite to his own sister that to any other young woman under heaven; and a young woman should ever turn to her brother as the one nearest in all this world to her until a husband stands by her side. Brothers and sisters are each other’s natural keepers. They should shield each other. They should be an inspiration to each other in the direction of all noble thought and better life. They should be each other’s guardian angels in this world of danger and of false and fatal paths.” –JR miller
  • Read online some of George Washington’s Rules of Civility and Decent Behavior (and use some for copywork)
  • Show these moving videos on various days as a source of inspiration:
  • Read:
  • A courteous person is gracious, always looking for kind things to say. Discuss how it can be much easier to complain than encourage. When things are wrong, we complain. However, when things are sunny and bright, we forget to express our thanks. What would it be like if we looked for things going right and thank those around us for their part? Meditate on Ephesians 4:29 together.
  • Make and use kindness flags
  • Brainstorm a list of ways to show kindness to siblings and try to do one each day. To follow up, on the following days at circle time, have children point out how they noticed each other being kind, so boasting can be avoided (and thankful encouragement can be practiced!).
  • Administer a fun quiz to figure out your kids love languages
  • The story of the relationship between Anne Sullivan and Helen Keller is an excellent example of “being a friend,” and reading the story together will get children thinking of “friendship” in a different vein– as an opportunity to sacrifice, lay down our lives, and incite others to higher purposes.
  • Study and discuss the pictures in this awesome book, a page or two at a time:

 

Bible:

  • Early Morning: Personal time in a variety of Bibles and Bible Storybooks, Leading Little Ones to God Devotional together or a NT excerpt from mommy’s Bible
  • School: Read and narrate stories from Judges-1 Samuel in the Children’s story Bible by Catherine Vos, or my ESV Study Bible (about 2 chapters a day, 3x a week)
  • Afternoon Quiet Time: Read at pleasure in our Child’s Study Bible tabbed on various topics; Draw and write in Prayer Journals
  • Night: Family Bible study led by daddy 3x a week

Leading Little Ones to God BB01

Memory Verses:

 Let nothing be done through selfish ambition or conceit, but in lowliness of mind let each esteem others better than himself. Let each of you look out not only for his own interests, but also for the interests of others. Philippians 2:3-4

Review previous February verses:

  • Luke 6:31 “Do unto others as you would have them do unto you.”
  • “We love Him because He first loved us.” 1 John 4:19
  • “A friend loves at all times.” Proverbs 17:17

Hymns:

Lovely hymns are full of more truth than many sermons (2nd and 3rd verses are often especially theologically deep), and can imprint precious truths on our hearts.

Fairest Lord Jesus

MP3 & Sheet Music

What a Friend We Have in Jesus
MP3 & Sheet Music Here

Poetry Recitation:

Snow-flakes

By Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

Out of the bosom of the Air,
      Out of the cloud-folds of her garments shaken,
Over the woodlands brown and bare,
      Over the harvest-fields forsaken,
            Silent, and soft, and slow
            Descends the snow.

Handwriting:

  • Writing for Real Life: Valentines, birthday cards, thank you cards, shopping lists, nature journal entries, prayer journal entries, All About Me book, spelling words, poem, or memory verse.
  • Hand write new reading words from Delightful Reading curriculum. (Faith)
  • 3 lessons a week in Print to Cursive. (Noah)

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Spelling (Noah):

Noah will study, word build, hand write, and recite the spelling of all the new reading words from one story a week. We don’t use the Pathway Series readers as readers, but rather as a fun way to provide the words for our spelling. We love the sweet stories in these books.

the wooden letters Noah and Faith use for word building (spelling)

Reading: (Faith)

Materials:  printed fable, loose letters, word cards for “that his claws were stronger than your teeth. Moral: It is easy to kick a man that is down.”

.

The Dogs and the Fox

By Aesop 

Some dogs, finding the skin of a lion, began to tear it in pieces with their teeth. A Fox, seeing them, said, “If this lion were alive, you would soon find out that his claws were stronger than your teeth.”

Moral: It is easy to kick a man that is down.


Reading Lessons:
“that his claws were stronger than your teeth. Moral: It is easy to kick a man that is down.”

1. Write one word from the selection on the board

2. Discuss the word

3. Study it closely, then erase

4. Find the word card from a small pile of cards, then hide the card

5. Spell the word with loose letters (from memory if possible)

6. Find the word in the printed fable

7. Repeat steps 1-6 with each word

8. Do a review of all the words listed up on the board

Word Building Lessons (spelling):

Using loose letters, build words that rhyme with each of the words assigned for this month (ex: claws–jaws, paws, laws, straws, gnaws, thaws, draws, etc.).

(Lessons 11-14 in Delightful Reading by Simply Charlotte Mason)

Vocabulary:

Most will be learned naturally in conversation as words in question arise, but Noah also looks up 1 word a week (and writes the definition in a notebook) to learn dictionary skills and spur his love for new words.

Webster's American Dictionary of the English Language, 1828 Edition - By: Noah Webster

Literature Read Alouds:

The Big Snow

History and Geography:

  • SCM’s Joshua-Malachi & Ancient Greece lesson plan book includes 1 chapter a week from a living book and 4 chapters a week from the spine (Bible portion is mentioned above). Noah will either narrate readings orally or narrate in his history sketchbook with a drawing of what he remembers.

Joshua through Malachi & Ancient Greece.  https://i1.wp.com/www.nothingnewpress.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/03/greeks-cover-600x400.jpg

  • One lesson a week from SCM’s Visits to the Middle East lesson plan book
  • Pray for the country of the week (as selected in the lesson plan book) using the prayer points in Window on the World

  • We will also do a few lessons from Home Geography

Math:

Lessons are from Kathy Richardson’s math books and AL Math Card Games:

Understanding Geometry Book

Exploration Time: In the morning just before school, provide pattern blocks, unifix cubes, building blocks, tangrams, geoboards, tiles, pattern blocks, etc. for free exploration of math materials. What can you do with these materials? What did you notice? What did you have to do in order to make it? Try to observe while they are working, and sometimes make a comment about what you observe. When children need a suggestion ask, “I wonder if….” or “Do you think it would work to….?” or “Do you have another idea?,” so that they feel free to decide on their own.

Ongoing Review: Spend a few minutes once a week during math lessons to practice instant recognition of number combinations. Use homemade “flashcards” with arrangements of items that can be counted (like toothpicks or buttons that can be grouped into two numbers upon closer inspection in order to quickly find the total). Hold up a card and say, “Tell me fast. How many?” Sometimes ask, “How did you know?” (Cause there is a four and a three, and that’s seven) When recognizing groups of more than five easily, child will have to mentally combine the smaller groups that make up the larger ones.

.

 .

.

Geometry:

Copy Cat (p.19) Children create structures out of provided or self-selected math materials and their partners copy them. For preschoolers, have their partner add just one block at a time as they copy if you see that they are struggling.

Recording Designs and Creations (p.22)

  • Pattern blocks: Record a pattern block design with pattern block paper shapes or triangle grid paper (for extra challenge). The challenge is in the reproduction. Provide a paper to build upon to control complexity–smaller paper for easier designs, bigger paper for more challenging designs.
  • Tiles: Record with colored paper squares.
  • Geoboards: Record on another geoboard (easier), onto same size geoboard paper (hard), onto smaller geoboard paper (harder), or onto plain paper (hardest). Ask children what they see in their design (“I see a trapezoid, a square, and a rectangle.”)

Noah’s Lessons:

  • Place Value lessons in Book #3 by Kathy Richardson–learning to regroup by 10’s.
  • Review Noah’s handmade subtraction book
  • Make fact family houses

IMG_0067

Games:

  • Telling Time tell time with clock cards, clock face and hands print out
  • Money set out an amount of money in quarters, have Noah exchange it for dimes and nickels and vice versa
  • To One Hundred (p. 26) Make a stock pile of 5’s and 10’s cards. Player take the top card and enters that number of beads on his abacus. Players take turns adding by 5’s and 10’s until someone reaches 100 exactly. Variation: Use a hundreds chart instead of an abacus.
  • Addition War (p. 39) Using about 40 1-9 numeral cards, deal the cards out evenly. Players take the top two cards from their stacks, set them face up, add them together, and say the sum aloud. The player with the higher sum takes all four cards. Equal sums means war and each player places two extra cards face down, and then places two more face up to add together. The higher sum takes all the cards.
  • Showing a Number On Various Manipulatives Use an abacus, place value cards, unifix cubes, and a hundreds chart to show a number like 37 or 56 or 94 on various manipulatives.
  • Corners (p.29) Practice sums totaling a multiple of 5 with Corners Cards
  • Go to the Dump (p.24) Repetition for memorizing facts to 10 (addition and subtraction)

Faith’s Lessons:

Week 1 Lets Pretend Stories (p. 105)Provide counters (such as unifix cubes) and colored construction paper to represent different environments: ocean (blue), grass (green), cave (black). Tell a story for the children to act out (like a word problem). For example: “Its a stormy day on the ocean. The waves are high and it is starting to rain. There are four ships on the ocean. Show me the ships. Three of the ships decide to go back to the harbor…..” These pretend stories provide imaginative counting practice/ addition and subtraction practice by noticing how many are left or how many there are altogether (this step is not necessary unless children are ready).

Week 2 Pattern Task Cards (p.151)
Have children copy simple or complex patterns using pattern blocks, unifix cubes, or dot paint.

Week 3 Matching (p.146)

Make number set cards (like the toothpick set pictured in my December lesson plan) with varying objects such as buttons, paper clips, bread tags, beads on bracelets, beads strung on yarn, onjects glued on popsicle sticks. Each set should include at least 3 or 4 of each of the numbers from 1 to 10. Also provide collections of various items (buttons, keys, nuts and blots, etc) and several sheets of construction paper. Have the child choose one of the number set cards. Then, have the child use the collections and construction paper to (like a mat) to build a set that has the same number as the card. What size numbers can he work with? Does she copy the arrangement?

Week 4 Exploring at the Weighing Station (p. 61)

When children first start learning about weight, they need the type of scales that show how the weight of an object actually pull down the scale. Make homemade scales by hanging a container by a rubber band off the end of a ruler weighed down by books on the other end. Make two scales so that objects to be weighed can be compared. Say, “Which do you think is heavier–the can or the rock? Let’s find out.”

Nature Study:

IMG_0297IMG_0306IMG_0308

Videos:

Reading Rainbow, Moody Science Classics, BBC’s Planet nature shows are what we rotate through at Family Movie Night on Fun Friday. We love all 3!

READING RAINBOW:DESERT LIFE

Traditions, Fun Friday Projects, and Other Ideas:

Have Noah write about the snow using this story frame, and then print out and paste a picture of him playing in the snow.

Snow

Snowflakes fall as softly as ________,
and as quietly as ________.
The snow is as cold as ________.
I love to watch the snow cover up________.
I love walking in the snow like a________.
I think I will save some snow in my ________.
The snow makes me happy because________.
Sometimes the snow makes me sad because_________.
Have kids find different ways to melt ice and see which works the fastest.

IMG_6605

Make a funny hard boiled egg snowman breakfast.

Building a felt snowman for little people

IMG_5135

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Have kids plan, set up, and hold a mini friendship tea party; practice manners and serving

IMG_8794

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kindess Flags were a successful character development idea last year

Kindness Flags

Deliver Valentines to Someone Elderly

IMG_5534

 

 
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Penguin watercolor art

Penguins Family Print of the Original watercolor Painting Cute Baby Pinguin Snowfall Arctic Animal FREE SHIPPING A4 21x30 cm

Fieldtrips:

  • Nature Grubs Class Feb. 24th–We’ll take an easy uphill hike to ponds and soggy places to look for playful salamanders and other signs of California Spring.
  • The Zoo
Leave a comment »

November Lesson Plans

2015-2016 Preschool-2nd Grade

To better understand how we use these lesson plans below, and get the “full picture”, please see our curriculum overview for the whole school year, and a “hypothetical” daily schedule (it rarely happens in perfection). To let you know where our plans come from, we purchase Simply Charlotte Mason’s lesson plan handbooks for History/Bible, Geography, and Nature Study. We use their free curriculum guide, book finder, and discussion forum to help us select books for other subjects (no lesson plan books needed). Living books, being the emphasis of a Charlotte Mason education, means that most of our curriculum is purchased from Abebooks.com, or comes free from the library. School for us is just a big stack of carefully chosen living books, and narration; no textbooks, workbooks, or scripted lesson plans. We love how Charlotte Mason methods are easy and delightful!

.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

.Fun Theme: Thanksgiving

Seasonal Theme: Autumn

Character/Habit: Thankfulness, Generosity, and Compassion vs. Selfishness

Bible: Judges, Ruth, 1 Samuel

History/Geography: Ancient Greece, Middle East

Nature Study: Ponds and Streams

.

Parent Study:

  • Make a prayer wall in our living room to help organize and increase our prayer time
  • Read Hints on Child Training
  • Read Caught up in a Story to help foster IMAGINATION
  • Read about Intercession

Art, Music, and Poetry Study:

All Things Bright and Beautiful Blog and picture study from Noah’s Ark book

Character/Habit Development:

Wisdom and the Millers: Proverbs for Children | Main photo (Cover)

  • Read Wisdom and the Millers: Pleasant Words p.97 and Envying Sinners p.121
  • Review Stewardship Street memory verses that go with each of the 7 categories of savings, and review the “Go to the ant checklist” poster by Doorposts together. Refine work habits and servant attitude, offer opportunities for initiative and choice (like Observe and Serve). Pay Noah (6) in dimes and Faith (5) in stickers once a week (a natural math opportunity).
  • Have Noah study and write out verses on selfishness, generosity, and thankfulness from his Child Training Bible and Child Virtue Bible (Child Study Bible– also see “Bible” section below)

Circle Time/Family Time:

Blessing Time:

  • Prophecy Phillipians 4:8 over our thoughts.

Whatever is true, whatever is honorable, whatever is just, whatever is pure, whatever is lovely, whatever is commendable, if there is any excellence, if there is anything worthy of praise, I think about these things.

  • Prophesy Psalms 82:3-4 and Isaiah 58:7-8 over our desire to reach out.

I defend the cause of the weak and fatherless, and maintain the rights of the poor and oppressed. I rescue the weak and needy, and deliver them from the hand of the wicked.

I share my bread with the hungry,
I bring to my house the poor who are cast out;
When you see the naked, I cover him…..
Then my light shall break forth like the morning,
My healing shall spring forth speedily,
And my righteousness shall go before me;
The glory of the Lord shall be my rear guard.

Prayer Time

  • Pray provision for the needy according to Isaiah 41:17-20

“The poor and needy search for water, but there is none; their tongues are parched with thirst. But I the Lord will answer them; I, the God of Israel, will not forsake them. I will make rivers flow on barren heights, and springs within the valleys. I will turn the desert into pools of water, and the parched ground into springs. I will put in the desert the cedar and the acacia, the myrtle and the olive. I will set junipers in the wasteland, the fir and the cypress together, so that people may see and know, may consider and understand, that the hand of the Lord has done this, that the Holy One of Israel has created it.”

  • Pray these simple prayers with little ones:
  • Dear God, if I am being selfish or greedy, please show me so I can tell You I am sorry. Amen.
  • Dear God, please forgive me for thinking of myself instead of others. Please send Your Holy Spirit to help me be generous instead. Amen.
  • Dear God, please help me to be generous so I can refresh others. Amen. (The generous will prosper; those who refresh others will themselves be refreshed. proverbs 11:25)
  • Dear God, sometimes I have selfishness in my heart. Please send Your Holy Spirit to smother it like water smothers fire. Amen.
  • Dear God, it is so easy to want things for myself. Please help me to think of others instead. Amen.
  • Dear God, please show my family and me how we can help the poor people who live in our community. Amen.

Sharing Time:

  • Share personal stories of experience with generosity, compassion, and gratitude. Thank God in prayer.
  • What are you tempted to complain about? What are you selfish about? Ask God for help.
  • What are you most thankful for? Thank God in prayer.
  • How would you like to generously help or give to others to help the world know Jesus? Ask God for help.

Discussion Time:

  • Pray over the stories we receive from Samaritan’s purse in their quarterly magazine, Prayer Point and the Voice of the Martyrs Magazine
  • Treasures in Heaven activity (use a 100’s chart and apply some math)
  • What do you think Jesus meant when He said, “A man’s life does not consist in the abundance of his possessions” (Luke 12:15)? Satan wants to steal joy from our lives by making us ungrateful for all that we have. He wants us to think about what we don’t have, instead of being thankful for what we do have. Is there anything you find it hard to thank God for?
  • Teach children how to give creative and powerful thanksgiving to God with Names of God Prayers
  • Seeing the Bright Side game
  • Slowly savor thoughtful ideas about generosity and compassion, read and discuss one a day:
    • “The miracle is this–the more we share, the more we have”–Leonard Nimoy
    • The Magic Penny song
    • Proverbs 11:24-25 “One person gives freely, yet gains even more….”
    • “If nature has made you for a giver, your hands are born open, and so is your heart; and though there may be times when your hands are empty, your heart is always full, and you can give things out of that. –Frances Hodgson Burnett

    • Little Sunshine (story of how its the thought that counts)
    • Old Mr. Rabbits Thanksgiving Dinner in The Book of Virtues
    • The Legend of the Dipper (one small act of kindness can turn into something very great)
    • The Parable of the Good Samaritan in Luke 10
    • Grandmother’s Table (compassion requires putting yourself in someone else’s shoes)
    • Mother Theresa from Heroes for my Son
    • Read Elizabeth Fry’s story from Hero Tales

 

Bible:

  • Early Morning: Personal time in a variety of Bibles and Bible Storybooks, Leading Little Ones to God Devotional together or a NT excerpt from mommy’s Bible
  • School: Read and narrate stories from Judges-1 Samuel in the Children’s story Bible by Catherine Vos, or my ESV Study Bible (about 2 chapters a day, 3x a week)
  • Afternoon Quiet Time: Read at pleasure in our Child’s Study Bible tabbed on various topics; Draw and write in Prayer Journals
  • Night: Family Bible study led by daddy 3x a week

Leading Little Ones to God BB01

Memory Verses:

Psalm 100 for giving thanks.

Make a joyful noise to the Lord, all the earth!
Serve the Lord with gladness!
Come into his presence with singing!

Know that the Lord, he is God!
It is he who made us, and we are his;
we are his people, and the sheep of his pasture.

Enter his gates with thanksgiving,
and his courts with praise!
Give thanks to him; bless his name!

For the Lord is good;
his steadfast love endures forever,
and his faithfulness to all generations.

  • Review November verses from previous years:
    • “Whenever you are able, do good to people who need help.” Proverbs 3:27
    • “Rejoice always, pray without ceasing, in everything give thanks; for this is the will of God in Christ Jesus for you. ”  1 Thessalonians 5:16-18

 Hymns:

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Poetry Recitation:

Beauty

by “E-Yeh-Shure”
Beauty is seen
In the sunlight,
The trees, the birds,
Corn growing and people working
Or dancing for their harvest.
Beauty is heard
In the night,
Wind sighing, rain falling,
Or a singer chanting
Anything in earnest.Beauty is in yourself.
Good deeds, happy thoughts
That repeat themselves
In your dreams,
In your work,
And even in your rest.

 

Handwriting:

  • Writing for Real Life: written letters, birthday cards, thank you cards, shopping lists, nature journal entries, prayer journal entries, All About Me book, spelling words, poem, or memory verse.
  • Hand write new reading words from Delightful Reading curriculum. (Faith)
  • 3 lessons a week in Print to Cursive. (Noah)

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Spelling: (Noah)

Noah will study, word build, hand write, and recite the spelling of all the new reading words from one story a week. We don’t use the Pathway Series readers as readers, but rather as a fun way to provide the words for our spelling. We love the sweet stories in these books.

Reading: (Faith)

Materials:  printed fable, loose letters, word cards for the title, the author, and “Some dogs, finding the skin of a lion”

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The Dogs and the Fox

By Aesop 

Some dogs, finding the skin of a lion, began to tear it in pieces with their teeth. A Fox, seeing them, said, “If this lion were alive, you would soon find out that his claws were stronger than your teeth.”

Moral: It is easy to kick a man that is down.


Reading Lessons: (the title, the author, and “Some dogs, finding the skin of a lion”)

1. Write one word from the poem on the board

2. Discuss the word

3. Study it closely, then erase

4. Find the word card from a small pile of cards, then hide the card

5. Spell the word with loose letters (from memory if possible)

6. Find the word in the printed poem

7. Repeat steps 1-6 with each word

8. Do a review of all the words listed up on the board

Word Building Lessons (spelling):

Using loose letters, build words that rhyme with each of the words assigned for this month (ex: dogs–hogs, bogs, jogs, logs, etc.).

(Lessons 9-12 in Delightful Reading by Simply Charlotte Mason)

 

Vocabulary:

Most will be learned naturally in conversation as words in question arise, but I also will have Noah look up words sometimes to learn dictionary skills and to spur a love for new words.

Webster's American Dictionary of the English Language, 1828 Edition - By: Noah Webster

Literature Read Alouds:

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History and Geography:

  • SCM’s Joshua-Malachi & Ancient Greece lesson plan book includes 1 chapter a week from a living book and 4 chapters a week from the spine (Bible portion is mentioned above). Noah will either narrate readings orally or narrate in his history sketchbook with a drawing of what he remembers.

Joshua through Malachi & Ancient Greece.  https://i1.wp.com/www.nothingnewpress.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/03/greeks-cover-600x400.jpg

  • One lesson a week from SCM’s Visits to the Middle East lesson plan book
  • Pray for the country of the week (as selected in the lesson plan book) using the prayer points in Window on the World

  • We will also do a few lessons from Home Geography

Math:

Lessons are from Kathy Richardson’s math books and AL Math Card Games:

Understanding Geometry Book

Exploration Time: In the morning just before school, provide pattern blocks, unifix cubes, building blocks, tangrams, geoboards, tiles, pattern blocks, etc. for free exploration of math materials. What can you do with these materials? What did you notice? What did you have to do in order to make it? Try to observe while they are working, and sometimes make a comment about what you observe. When children need a suggestion ask, “I wonder if….” or “Do you think it would work to….?” or “Do you have another idea?,” so that they feel free to decide on their own.

Ongoing Review: Spend a few minutes once a week during math lessons to practice instant recognition of number combinations. Use homemade “flashcards” with arrangements of items that can be counted (like toothpicks or buttons that can be grouped into two numbers upon closer inspection in order to quickly find the total). Hold up a card and say, “Tell me fast. How many?” Sometimes ask, “How did you know?” (Cause there is a four and a three, and that’s seven) When recognizing groups of more than five easily, child will have to mentally combine the smaller groups that make up the larger ones.

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Geometry:

Copy Cat (p.19) Children create structures out of provided or self-selected math materials and their partners copy them. For preschoolers, have their partner add just one block at a time as they copy if you see that they are struggling.

Recording Designs and Creations (p.22)

  • Pattern blocks: Record a pattern block design with pattern block paper shapes or triangle grid paper (for extra challenge). The challenge is in the reproduction. Provide a paper to build upon to control complexity–smaller paper for easier designs, bigger paper for more challenging designs.
  • Tiles: Record with colored paper squares.
  • Geoboards: Record on another geoboard (easier), onto same size geoboard paper (hard), onto smaller geoboard paper (harder), or onto plain paper (hardest). Ask children what they see in their design (“I see a trapezoid, a square, and a rectangle.”)

Noah’s Lessons:

  • Place Value lessons in Book #3 by Kathy Richardson on pages 24-33–learning to regroup by 5’s, 6’s, and 10’s.
  • Noah will continue recording subtraction facts in in his blank Subtraction Book, just as he slowly made an Addition Book recording all addition facts (up to 10) that he explored with manipulatives last school year. For example, after doing the “combinations of 7” activity pictured below, he used colored pencils to record his findings (3+4=7, 5+2=7, etc.) with pictures of cubes labeled with number sentences in his book (held in his hands). Each 2 page spread was dedicated to the research compiled for one number. After each math lesson, he would look into his book to see if he had discovered a new combination or if he confirmed one that he had already recorded. IMG_0067

Games:

  • Telling Time tell time with clock cards, clock face and hands print out
  • Money set out an amount of money in quarters, have Noah exchange it for dimes and nickels and vice versa
  • To One Hundred (p. 26) Make a stock pile of 5’s and 10’s cards. Player take the top card and enters that number of beads on his abacus. Players take turns adding by 5’s and 10’s until someone reaches 100 exactly. Variation: Use a hundreds chart instead of an abacus.
  • Addition War (p. 39) Using about 40 1-9 numeral cards, deal the cards out evenly. Players take the top two cards from their stacks, set them face up, add them together, and say the sum aloud. The player with the higher sum takes all four cards. Equal sums means war and each player places two extra cards face down, and then places two more face up to add together. The higher sum takes all the cards.
  • Showing a Number On Various Manipulatives Use an abacus, place value cards, unifix cubes, and a hundreds chart to show a number like 37 or 56 or 94 on various manipulatives.
  • Corners (p.29) Practice sums totaling a multiple of 5 with Corners Cards
  • Go to the Dump (p.24) Repetition for memorizing facts to 10 (addition and subtraction)

Faith’s Lessons:

Week 1  Hunt for It (p. 38)

Materials: counters, 5-6 bowls/margarine tubs, dot cubes (dice, or make your own) or numeral cubes (make your own) with quantities at your child’s level (1-6 or 4-9 or 7-12 for example) Lesson: Hide various sets of counters under five or six bowls. Name a number and have children hunt for that number, lifting one bowl at a time. Children say whether each number they find is “more” or “less” than the one named. Instead of naming a number, you could also provide a dot cube or numeral cube to teach recognizing quantities and reading numerals. Extension: Have children write the number of counters that were hidden.

Week 2 Shape Puzzles (p. 60)

Materials: unifix cubes, shape puzzles Lesson: The children estimate how many cubes will fit in a shape puzzle and then check to see how many cubes fit in the shape puzzle. Extension: Children can write the numerals down when they check each puzzle. Increase the size of the shape puzzle for children ready to work with large numbers.

Week 3 How Many Ways? (p. 100)

Materials: Various patterning objects (small colored square papers, buttons, unifix cubes, seashells, etc. Markers or crayons, and glue. Lesson: Give the children a pattern such as AABB, ABC, AAB, etc. Have them work to see how many different ways they can show that pattern using their choice of objects. Glue the objects down or copy the pattern down with markers or crayons. Make a chart/display of all the ways they came up with.

Week 4 Spin and Peek (p. 150)

Materials: Counters, eight or nine bowls, more/less spinner (use a spinner you already own, cover one half with paper labeled “More” and one half with paper labeled “Less”) Lesson: Played like concentration. Lift a bowl, count the counters, spin the more/less spinner to see if he or she should look for a bowl with more counters or less counters than the first bowl. If he or she finds it, take those two bowls out of the game. Play until all bowls are out of the game.

Nature Study:

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Spanish:

A few lessons from Speaking Spanish, a book that uses Charlotte Mason methods.

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Videos:

Reading Rainbow, Moody Science Classics, BBC’s Planet nature shows are what we rotate through at Family Movie Night on Fun Friday. We love all 3!

READING RAINBOW:DESERT LIFE

Traditions and Fun Friday Projects:

Write a thank you letter to a community helper

Pack an Operation Christmas Child Shoebox

 

 

Make and pass out soup to the homeless in our downtown area

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Make a thankful tree

Fieldtrips:

  • Hidden Lakes Park
  • Nature Grubs Class–learn fun secrets about bones on November 4th with East Bay Parks naturalist Katie Colbert
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October Lesson Plans

2015-2016 Preschool-2nd Grade

I pray that the eyes of your heart may be enlightened, so that you will know what is the hope of His calling, what are the riches of the glory of His inheritance in the saints.

Ephesians 1:18

“God has laid up spiritual blessings for us in his Son the Lord Jesus; but requires us to draw them out and fetch them in by prayer.” –Matthew Henry

Ephesians 1:18 has a very special place in my memories. There was a season in my late teens/early twenties where God met me so richly and deeply; the eyes of my understanding were being opened, and I was walking in oceans deep. My friends, sister, and I spent hours praying and seeking Him because it felt like the heavens opened to rain down His sweet presence every time we gathered. I didn’t understand why it was happening, except that I knew our pastors believed in our potential and prayed hard for us. They laid hands on me and the other youth, and spoke over our lives many times. As they prayed, God rushed upon us in such a way that we were crying or speechless or laid out on the floor. The scripture verse that stood out the most from this season of life and will be forever etched in my heart was Ephesians 1:18.

With a heart full of expectation, Ephesians 1:18, was what I felt impressed to make our theme verse for this school year. I pray that God will open the eyes of my children’s hearts so that they can imagine the riches of God’s will for their future, that even while they are imaginitively pretending during long creative afternoon play sessions, they are in the Holy Spirit, and dreaming big! I pray for their exciting calling to be courageous heroes for Christ as Ephesians becomes fulfilled in their lives. I pray for courageous children who grow up to powerfully serve the Lord and make a difference in this world.

Every year in October at Jesus’s Precious Lambs we study and visit community helpers, and the children think about what they want to be when they grow up. Last year, God really breathed life into the theme as He gave mommy and daddy ideas to kindle the fires of our children’s heroic astronaut dreams. We found an astronaut costume at a second hand store, we went to Chabot Space and Science Center, we made a big cardboard rocket, we checked out astronaut and space books from the library, and made some awesome spaceship paintings. It was such a special, unforgettable month, and yet just the beginning of so much more. Through prayer, and the opening of the eyes of our hearts to understand the hope of His calling, these natural activities had a special supernatural dimension that is hard to express in words. The presence of the Lord is in the stuff that dreams are made of, and though my kids may not become astronauts, the dreaming capacity of their hearts, and ours, was certainly enlarged that month.

I love the “super” that is put on the natural, when targeted, Spirit-led prayer is a component of lesson planning in homeschool. Don’t you love when the reading for the day “just happens” to really speak to where your family is at, or you are studying insects and the children catch a praying mantis or dragonfly or butterfly in the backyard, or you find a new way to present math or spelling that really smooths out the day?? Sometimes these are bright spots of God’s unexpected and undeserved grace on our homeschool……… but sometimes they are spiritual blessings that have been drawn out or fetched from the spirit realm by intentional prayer. “Praise be to the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, who has blessed us in the heavenly realms with every spiritual blessing in Christ.” Ephesian 1:3

A most wonderful spiritual blessing for a homeschooling family is the growth of a child’s character. I challenge us all to make specific prayer requests in areas that we desire to see growth in our children, and then just as importantly, to look expectantly and eagerly each day for the answers to those prayers. We will find answers abound when we are looking for them in every little thing. When we train ourselves to find the hand of God in daily life, we will begin to see so much more. As we see more, faith rises more, enabling us to see even more, and so we are able believe for always more than before. The faith enlarging pursuit of growing children in the character of God, with the partnership of the Spirit, is an exciting snowball effect that puts passion into our homeschools! The largest passion of our Jesus’ Precious Lambs homeschool comes from character study/habit training.

Any effective character study begins in prayer. In order to combat negative habits, such as fear or quarreling, and then be empowered to move forward in virtues, such as courage or peacemaking, the power of prayer is essential. Since character growth begins with prayer, prayers are being uttered from my lips before the month even begins, as soon as a character trait/habit has been selected. Every month I select a new habit for us all to work on while we continue to work on an “old” habit (we maintain the special traditions that go along with the original “habits of the month” from our “Masterplan“–for example, we continue to work on “courage” year after year as the repeating theme of October). I use various books and websites to gather relevant stories, poems, quotes, scriptures, etc., that will serve as inspiration to change and as discussion starters at Circle Time. We start school everyday with character discussions at Circle Time, and allow time to pray together for the divine assistance we need in order to achieve a measure of success by the end of the month. I have seen God move every month in our family in response to these simple steps of faith!

Since it all revolves around prayer, I add a section called “Prayer Time” right into my lesson plans, which is a list of prayer ideas for the month (see plans below). Planning prayer really helps us to pray more targeted prayers, and to pray with scriptural insight and guidance over the new habit we are forming. I use the prayer points listed in “Prayer Time” during my personal prayer time as well as with the kids in Circle Time. I also ask family or friend prayer partners to print out the prayers, and uphold my kids all month by uniting with us, praying the same prayer targets. Kids of Integrity has great sample prayers that we like to use (and fun hands on character study ideas too). It took several years of homeschooling, but we are getting more strategic in our approach to prayer, praise God.

Another important prayer strategy is prophesying–making a declaration, or calling things forth. We must speak boldly and often about what God is going to do. When faced with various challenges, we boldly speak out the hopes of our hearts that align with scripture; calling forth “things that are not as though they are.” A mother’s Godly dreams for her family often differ from how things at home actually look, so she must be courageous to call those dreams forth in the spirit realm. For example, if I sense false or empty or aimless occupations trying to take residence in my children’s hearts, my prophetic declaration (preceded by some Bible study) might sound like this:

“My children desire God above all else, and pursue Him passionately in prayer, worship and the Word. As the Spirit hovers over our school, my children creatively display God’s glory through art, writing, singing, nature study and other academic and creative means. They articulately discuss the scriptures during family discussions, growing in wisdom and stature, and in favor with God and man. In meekness and grace they share the truth and defend the truth in the world; blameless and pure, they shine like stars as they hold forth the Word of life. The eyes of their hearts are open, the deep mysteries and secrets of God’s heart are revealed to them, and they know their unique calling and rich inheritance. They perceive who they are created to be in Christ Jesus and boldly pursue the calling on their life. They are heroes for Christ who serve their generation. They are ministers of love in our family and circle of neighbors; God has them right here, right now, for such a time as this.”

Prophecy can sound a lot like prayer, but it is a declaration more than a request, and is spoken in the present tense. It’s only a matter of time until what we spoke in the spirit realm manifests itself in the natural. What we say today creates our tomorrow, so start prophesying those hopes for your family now.

I am ready to walk into revelation oceans deep with my children right there beside me, aren’t you? God, open the eyes of our hearts and enlighten us to understand strategic and intentional approaches to prayer, lesson planning, and habit training. Let passion come. Let us walk upon the waters wherever You would call us; Spirit lead us to a place without borders. XOXOXO

To better understand how we use these lesson plans below, and get the “full picture”, please see our curriculum overview for the whole school year, and a “hypothetical” daily schedule (it rarely happens in perfection). To let you know where our plans come from, we purchase Simply Charlotte Mason’s lesson plan handbooks for History/Bible, Geography, and Nature Study. We use their free curriculum guide, book finder, and discussion forum to help us select books for other subjects (no lesson plan books needed). Living books, being the emphasis of a Charlotte Mason education, means that most of our curriculum is purchased from Abebooks.com, or comes free from the library. School for us is just a big stack of carefully chosen living books, and narration; no textbooks, workbooks, or scripted lesson plans. We love how Charlotte Mason methods are easy and delightful!

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.Fun Theme: Community Helpers/Heroes

Seasonal Theme: Autumn

Character/Habit: Fear vs. Courage, Quarreling vs. Peacemaking

Bible: Joshua and Judges

History/Geography: Ancient Greece, Middle East

Nature Study: Ponds and Streams

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Parent Study:

Image result for hints on child training

  • Make a prayer wall in our living room to help organize and increase our prayer time
  • Read Hints on Child Training
  • Read Caught up in a Story to help foster IMAGINATION

Art, Music, and Poetry Study:

All Things Bright and Beautiful Blog and picture study from Noah’s Ark book

Character/Habit Development:

Wisdom and the Millers: Proverbs for Children | Main photo (Cover)

  • Read Wisdom and the Millers: A Place of Refuge p.80 and A Brother’s Love p.108
  • Review Stewardship Street memory verses that go with each of the 7 categories of savings, and review the “Go to the ant checklist” poster by Doorposts together. Refine work habits and servant attitude, offer opportunities for initiative and choice (like Observe and Serve). Pay Noah (6) in dimes and Faith (4) in stickers once a week (a natural math opportunity).
  • Have Noah study and write out verses on fear and quarreling from his Child Training Bible (Child Study Bible– also see “Bible” section below)

Circle Time/Family Time:

Blessing Time:

Prophesy Ephesians 1:18 over ourselves.

I pray that the eyes of our hearts may be enlightened, so that we will know what is the hope of His calling, what are the riches of the glory of His inheritance in the saints.

Ephesians 1:18

Prayer Time

  • Bring a prepared scripture verse promise to Circle Time for each child to memorize and learn to stand on this month. Make it personal and based on each child’s needs. Hold each others needs and corresponding promise close to our hearts in prayer the entire school year. Teach children to pray over siblings and friends and their promises.
  • Pray for children who heroically stand up for what they believe in, face and overcome temptation, and stand strongly in the face of adversity. Pray for the exciting future careers and callings of my children, and for their most exciting calling of all–to be courageous heroes for Christ. Pray for courageous children who grow up to powerfully serve the Lord and make a difference in this world. Pray this prayer for courage.
  • Pray for peace at home between brothers and sister. Pray this prayer for peacemakers.

Sharing Time:

  • Talk about what scares us personally, and how we might work to overcome our fears. Also, practice giving encouragement to embolden one another, both in sharing time and in scary situations.
  • Do something really brave this month and share about it at circle
  • Bring a picture and/or story of someone who is a hero to you

Discussion Time:

Read these stories, poems, & quotes/do the activities, and then start a discussion.

Courage: “Mental or moral strength to venture, persevere, and withstand danger, fear, or difficulty

  • Slowly savor thoughtful ideas about courage, discuss one a day:
    • selfishness makes us cowards, but thinking of others makes us braver
    • we become brave by doing brave acts
    • we practice bravery by acting brave when we don’t really feel brave
    • the brave person is not someone who is never afraid
    • the fear of failures never hurts as bad as we expect them to
    • we imagine our fears into existence (Job and Chicken Little)
    • to refrain from foolish cowardice, refrain from too much mountain-making our of molehills
  • Read short true stories about the lives of Christian heroes

Peacemaker:

Bible:

  • Early Morning: Personal time in a variety of Bibles and Bible Storybooks, Leading Little Ones to God Devotional together or a NT excerpt from mommy’s Bible
  • School: Read and narrate stories from Joshua and Judges in the Children’s story Bible by Catherine Vos, or my ESV Study Bible (about 2 chapters a day, 3x a week)
  • Afternoon Quiet Time: Read at pleasure in our Child’s Study Bible tabbed on various topics; Draw and write in Prayer Journals
  • Night: Family Bible study led by daddy 3x a week

Leading Little Ones to God BB01

Memory Verses:

‘And in the last days it shall be, God declares, that I will pour out my Spirit on all flesh, and your sons and your daughters shall prophesy, and your young men shall see visions, and your old men shall dream dreams.” Acts 2:17
Also we will review:

  • Psalm 23
  • Review October verses from previous years: “God is our refuge and strength, a very present help in trouble.” Psalm 46:1
  • “Be of good courage, and he shall strengthen your heart, all ye that hope in the Lord.” Psalms 31:24

 Hymns:

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Poetry Recitation:

Hold Fast Your Dreams

by Louise Driscoll
Hold fast your dreams!
Within your heart
Keep one still, secret spot
Where dreams may go,
And, sheltered so,
May thrive and grow
Where doubt and fear are not.
O keep a place apart,
Within your heart,
For little dreams to go!

Handwriting:

  • Writing for Real Life: written letters, birthday cards, thank you cards, shopping lists, nature journal entries, prayer journal entries, All About Me book, spelling words, poem, or memory verse.
  • Hand write new reading words from Delightful Reading curriculum. (Faith)
  • First 12 lessons in Print to Cursive. (Noah)

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Spelling: (Noah)

Noah will study, word build, hand write, and recite the spelling of all the new reading words from one story a week. We don’t use the Pathway Series readers as readers, but rather as a fun way to provide the words for our spelling. We love the sweet stories in these books.

Reading: (Faith)

Materials:  printed poem, word cards for each of the following words, loose letters                 

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                   Rain

“The rain is falling all around

It falls on tree and field”…….

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Reading Lessons:

1. Write one word from the poem on the board

2. Discuss the word

3. Study it closely, then erase

4. Find the word card from a small pile of cards, then hide the card

5. Spell the word with loose letters (from memory if possible)

6. Find the word in the printed poem

7. Repeat steps 1-6 with each word

8. Do a review of all the words listed up on the board

Word Building Lessons (reading and pre-spelling):

Using loose letters, build words that rhyme with each of the words in the 1st two lines of the poem (ex: rain–Cain, stain, plain, train, gain).

(Lessons 1-4 in Delightful Reading by Simply Charlotte Mason)

Vocabulary:

Most will be learned naturally in conversation as words in question arise, but I also will have Noah look up words sometimes to learn dictionary skills and to spur a love for new words.

Webster's American Dictionary of the English Language, 1828 Edition - By: Noah Webster

Literature Read Alouds:

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History and Geography:

  • SCM’s Joshua-Malachi & Ancient Greece lesson plan book includes 1 chapter a week from a living book and 4 chapters a week from the spine (Bible portion is mentioned above). Noah will either narrate readings orally or narrate in his history sketchbook with a drawing of what he remembers.

Joshua through Malachi & Ancient Greece.  https://i1.wp.com/www.nothingnewpress.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/03/greeks-cover-600x400.jpg

  • One lesson a week from SCM’s Visits to the Middle East lesson plan book
  • Pray for the country of the week (as selected in the lesson plan book) using the prayer points in Window on the World

  • We will also do a few lessons from Home Geography

Math:

Lessons are from Kathy Richardson’s math books and AL Math Card Games:

Understanding Geometry Book

Exploration Time: In the morning just before school, provide pattern blocks, unifix cubes, building blocks, tangrams, geoboards, tiles, pattern blocks, etc. for free exploration of math materials. What can you do with these materials? What did you notice? What did you have to do in order to make it? Try to observe while they are working, and sometimes make a comment about what you observe. When children need a suggestion ask, “I wonder if….” or “Do you think it would work to….?” or “Do you have another idea?,” so that they feel free to decide on their own.

Ongoing Review: Spend a few minutes once a week during math lessons to practice instant recognition of number combinations. Use homemade “flashcards” with arrangements of items that can be counted (like toothpicks or buttons that can be grouped into two numbers upon closer inspection in order to quickly find the total). Hold up a card and say, “Tell me fast. How many?” Sometimes ask, “How did you know?” (Cause there is a four and a three, and that’s seven) When recognizing groups of more than five easily, child will have to mentally combine the smaller groups that make up the larger ones.

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Geometry:

Copy Cat (p.19) Children create structures out of provided or self-selected math materials and their partners copy them. For preschoolers, have their partner add just one block at a time as they copy if you see that they are struggling.

Recording Designs and Creations (p.22)

  • Pattern blocks: Record a pattern block design with pattern block paper shapes or triangle grid paper (for extra challenge). The challenge is in the reproduction. Provide a paper to build upon to control complexity–smaller paper for easier designs, bigger paper for more challenging designs.
  • Tiles: Record with colored paper squares.
  • Geoboards: Record on another geoboard (easier), onto same size geoboard paper (hard), onto smaller geoboard paper (harder), or onto plain paper (hardest). Ask children what they see in their design (“I see a trapezoid, a square, and a rectangle.”)

Noah’s Lessons:

  • Place Value lessons in Book #3 by Kathy Richardson on pages 14-31–learning to regroup by 4’s, 5’s, and 6’s (preparation for grouping by 10’s, the base 10 system).
  • Noah will begin recording subtraction facts in in his blank Subtraction Book, just as he slowly made an Addition Book recording all addition facts (up to 10) that he explored with manipulatives last school year. For example, after doing the “combinations of 7” activity pictured below, he used colored pencils to record his findings (3+4=7, 5+2=7, etc.) with pictures of cubes labeled with number sentences in his book (held in his hands). Each 2 page spread was dedicated to the research compiled for one number. After each math lesson, he would look into his book to see if he had discovered a new combination or if he confirmed one that he had already recorded. IMG_0067

Games:

  • Time to Any Hour (p. 61) Put the hour and minute cards face down in two separate piles. Provide a real clock. Have child form a time by turning over the top minute card and the top hour card, and then set the clock to match.
  • Compare Times (p. 62) Players take turns setting the clock. Then they make the time with their cards.
  • To One Hundred (p. 26) Make a stock pile of 5’s and 10’s cards. Player take the top card and enters that number of beads on his abacus. Players take turns adding by 5’s and 10’s until someone reaches 100 exactly. Variation: Use a hundreds chart instead of an abacus.
  • Addition War (p. 39) Using about 40 1-9 numeral cards, deal the cards out evenly. Players take the top two cards from their stacks, set them face up, add them together, and say the sum aloud. The player with the higher sum takes all four cards. Equal sums means war and each player places two extra cards face down, and then places two more face up to add together. The higher sum takes all the cards.
  • Showing a Number On Various Manipulatives Use an abacus, place value cards, unifix cubes, and a hundreds chart to show a number like 37 or 56 or 94 on various manipulatives.
  • Sort Attribute Blocks One person sorts all the blocks one at a time into piles according to a secret rule (thin and red), while the others watch and try to guess the rule. Or one person chooses a rule, and the other chooses a block and asks if it belongs. Play continues until the rule can be stated.
  • Make Attribute Block Patterns Also have the child find the error in a pattern or a missing block.

Extra: Download and print open ended math questions to use as time allows. Ask Noah to provide as many answers as he can (When applicable).

Example of an open ended question:

http://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/FREEBIE-January-Open-Ended-Math-Question-for-Journals-or-Do-Nows-First-Grade-1601205

Faith’s Lessons:

Week 1  Copy a Design Made on a Geoboard

Week 2 Grow and Shrink (p. 35)

Materials: Counters, dot cubes (dice, or make your own) or numeral cubes (make your own) with quantities at your child’s level (1-6 or 4-9 or 7-12 for example). Lesson: Name a number and have children put out that many counters. Name another number and have children show that number. Continue naming numbers and notice how the children approach the task. Do they remove all the counters every time or do they add (or take off) just the amount they need? Say, “Do you think we need to get some more or take some off to make the number?”, but do not teach them how to add and take away counters. Simply observe their level of thinking. Extension: Have children roll a dot cube to practice recognizing quantities, or a number cube to practice recognizing numerals.

Week 3 Arrangement Patterns (p. 107)

Materials: Unifx cubes and pattern task cards made by drawing squares in different arrangments. Lesson: Children choose a task card, copy the pattern with the unifix cubes, and then extend the pattern. Children will learn that patterns are not just in straight lines.

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Week 4 Is it More or Less? (p. 146)

Materials: Unifix cubes. Lesson: Have children build several trains of specified lengths (all under ten). Say, “Show me a train that has more than six. Show me a train that has less than six.” State the relationship together: “Four is less than six, six is more than four.” Repeat with trains of various lengths. Extension: Decide how many more or how many less one train has than the other. “What can we do to the red train to make it just as long as the blue train?” is easier than “How many more cubes does the red train have than the blue train?” Choose the wording your children are ready for.

Week 5 Stacks

Materials: Unifix cubes Lesson: You and the children each make a stack of 10 to 12 cubes and then hide the stacks behind your backs. Say, “Stacks,” and then everyone breaks off part of their stack and places it in front of them. Each child compares their stack to yours announcing something like, “Two is less than three” or “Five is more than three”. Ask, “What can we do to make these two stacks the same?” or “How many more cubes does your stack have than mine?” (Five cubes is 2 more than 3) depending on what language each child is ready for.

          Games:

  • Dot and Number Memory (p.14) Match even and odd dot cards to matching numeral cards (all placed in order in two separate rows upside down).
  • Even Odd Dot Memory (p.15) Same as game above except one person collects evens, the other collects odds (to become more aware of the difference).
  • Build a staircase on the abacus
  • Sort Attribute Blocks–same shape, different thickness; same color, different shape; same thickness, different size; different color, different thickness; same thickness, different shape; same thickness, different size, different shape; same color, different thickness, different shape.

Nature Study:

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Spanish:

A few lessons from Speaking Spanish, a book that uses Charlotte Mason methods.

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Videos:

Reading Rainbow, Moody Science Classics, BBC’s Planet nature shows are what we rotate through at Family Movie Night on Fun Friday. We love all 3!

READING RAINBOW:DESERT LIFE

Traditions and Fun Friday Projects:

  • Chalk Pastel Fall Art

Fall Walk in the Woods Chalk Pastel Art Tutorial www.hodgepodge.me

  • Collect Signs of Fall, Make a Collage, Do Leaf Rubbings, Press Leaves, and Draw Fall Leaves in Our Nature Journals

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  • Make and deliver our annual “Fall Blessings” to the neighbors and spend time during morning devotions praying for each family.

Putting Some Blessings Together for Our Neighbors

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  • Invite a Neighbor to Tea

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Fieldtrips:

  • Exploratorium–October 9th
  • Ardenwood Harvest Festival–pick popping corn to take home on Sunday, October 11th
  • Nature Grubs Class–learn fun secrets about rattlesnakes on October 21st with East Bay Parks naturalist Katie Colbert

Picking Popcorn at Ardenwood Historic Farm

“Freedom lies in being bold.” ― Robert Frost

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September Lesson Plans

2015-2016 Preschool-2nd Grade

How special and unique each of God’s children are! How comforting that God loves every one of us as His child! Although many things change each school year, September always remains the time in our school to celebrate how special God has made us. After 4 years of Precious Lambs, our masterplan of monthly themes that God gave us, like September’s “I am Special” theme, have become the rhythm of our lives, and family traditions more than themes. We look forward to making yet another “All About Me” book this year and seeing how the product turns out remarkably different than last time, reflecting the growth of each child’s mind and heart over the last year. Two years ago we could barely make out Noah’s precious wibbly wobbly writing in his “I am Special” book. It was quite an undertaking, but I wouldn’t trade it for anything! With everything from interests to dreams, these books are a poignant message of who God has made us to be.

School here starts each year with a look inward and upward. Who am I? Why am I here? What should I do? What is my destiny? What does it all mean? These are the profound questions we re-visit each September with our “I am Special/I am a Child of God” theme. I think its important to provide an aim, a sense of purpose, and an orientation for the rest of the school year ahead by exploring these questions now. We search to know ourselves, and ultimately we find answers to all these questions inseparable from a strong relationship with God. Ultimately when we serve Him and others, and virtue or character is developed, we find the answers to these pressing questions. Most surprisingly, we find that the development of character traits actually is a destination.

Along with encouraging a Godly sense of purpose in my children, there is some other character work to be done this month. Noah will be using his new Child Training Bible to study the topic of pride, and I will be praying that God will deal with his heart in this area as I have heard some “I am better than you” type statements crop up lately, and found an unteachable attitude in him at times. Also, I am realizing that although my kids are obedient, I would like to see them take more initiative. In my own character, I struggle with being overly authoritarian and I am praying for a quiet, gentle spirit. After my typically soft hearted Noah divulged that “even when you are not mad, I am afraid sometimes that you are” and that he starts feeling upset when I am simply speaking passionately, I knew that I am treading in dangerous waters.  If I am a tyrant and obtain obedience through undue harshness, then my children will probably become the kind of workers who do what they are told—and no more—and likely with a sullen attitude. Kids like this become used to taking orders, not taking initiative. My kids are pretty good at getting work done around the house, but its because I tell them to do it. Otherwise, that shoe in the middle of the floor would probably stay there forever. And this lack of initiative spills over into many areas of life.

A child who learns to walk into a room, see a problem, and resolve it will climb to much higher levels of success in any business, family, or ministry. Children need to learn to see a need and care enough to fill it. Household chores are a great training ground for children to learn to take initiative at home. If a child has to be told to feed the cat or clean up toys every day, the child has not learned initiative yet.

There are two preceding requirements to being able to take initiative: children need the skills to do the task, and they need to care about doing it. Caring about helping others comes through prayer, practice, inspiration derived from stories and other exemplars, and gentle persuasive discussions with a parent that move, rather than force, a child’s will towards “wanting to.” Skill comes through the more obvious means of “job training.” If children have the skills, and a heart for others, then they just need a little “initiative prompting” to think about how they could make a difference in any given situation.

Getting my children to take initiative to help clean the house to my level of expectation before school everyday is a lot to ask of a 6 and 4 year old. We have been working on this skill set for awhile, but I need to pray that they would have more desire to serve. I would love to see more “want to” and less “have to” attitude in their lives, and the happiness that results. For example, somehow I would like to start weaning them off total dependence on mommy’s “job board” that tells them what to do everyday, and move them towards finding, listing, and keeping track themselves, the jobs they will do for the day to serve their family, as a little move towards fostering initiative. Also, although not as productive from my side of it, I am looking forward to doing more Observe and Serve because it definitely elicits more enthusiasm and more initiative than the “job board” grind. I believe that God will also show you how to tweak things this year to help send your children in the direction of a happy place of initiation, and so that the shoe will finally be removed from the middle of your floor too.

To better understand how we use these lesson plans below, and get the “full picture”, please see our curriculum overview for the whole school year, and a “hypothetical” daily schedule (it rarely happens in perfection). To let you know where our plans come from, we purchase Simply Charlotte Mason’s lesson plan handbooks for History/Bible, Geography, and Nature Study. We use their free curriculum guide, book finder, and discussion forum to help us select books for other subjects (no lesson plan books needed). Living books, being the emphasis of a Charlotte Mason education, means that most of our curriculum is purchased from Abebooks.com, or comes free from the library. School for us is just a big stack of carefully chosen living books, and narration; no textbooks, workbooks, or scripted lesson plans. We love how Charlotte Mason methods are easy and delightful!

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.Fun Theme: I am So Special

Seasonal Theme: Apples, Back to School

Character/Habit: Pride vs. Humility, Wise children take initiative

Bible: Joshua and Judges

History/Geography: Ancient Greece, Middle East

Nature Study: Ponds and Streams

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Parent Study:

  • Make a prayer wall in our living room to help organize and increase our prayer time
  • Read Hints on Child Training
  • Read Caught up in a Story to help foster IMAGINATION

Art, Music, and Poetry Study:

All Things Bright and Beautiful Blog and picture study from Noah’s Ark book

Character/Habit Development:

Wisdom and the Millers: Proverbs for Children | Main photo (Cover)

  • Read the stories “As Smoke to the Eyes p. 34” and “Boast Not of Tomorrow p.134” in Wisdom and the Millers
  • Review Stewardship Street memory verses that go with each of the 7 categories of savings, and review the “Go to the ant checklist” poster by Doorposts together. Refine work habits and servant attitude, offer opportunities for initiative and choice (like Observe and Serve). Pay Noah (6) in dimes and Faith (4) in stickers once a week (a natural math opportunity in an everyday situation).
  • Have Noah study and write out verses on pride and humility from his Habit Training Bible (AKA Child Study Bible–see “Bible” studies below)

Circle Time/Family Time:

Blessing Time:

Acknowledge each child’s unique traits and giftings, what I see ahead for this school year and how God can use him/her, my confidence in his/her ability to succeed in areas of previous struggle, and pray scriptural empowerment that specifically ministers to each need as I lay hands on them. “Then Jesus took the children in his arms and placed his hands on their heads and blessed them.” Mark 10:16

Prayer Time

  • Print out and pray these prayers and scriptures for humility this month. And these three for initiative in helping others and initiative in making an idea a reality:
    • “So whoever knows the right thing to do and fails to do it, for him it is sin.” James 4:17
    • Proverbs 16:3 “Commit thy works unto the LORD, and thy thoughts shall be established.”
    • Proverbs 3:27-28 “Withhold not good from them to whom it is due, when it is in the power of thine hand to do it. Say not unto thy neighbor, Go, and come again, and to morrow I will give; when thou hast it by thee.”

Sharing Time:

  • Bring something really cool to circle that God created
  • Bring something to circle that you are really proud of
  • Mommy share: Warm hearts and enjoy a sweet slideshow made by mommy with pictures that show many different ways that each child is special
  • Mommy Share: Put together a shoebox box of things that are very special to you and give insight into who you are as a person, and share about yourself with your children. (a favorite toy or book from childhood, a cherished piece of jewelery, a piece of school work, something you made yourself, etc.) Then have children try to do the same thing with their own shoebox of items at circle time on another day.
  • Family Share: Let each person in the family have a turn to sit in the middle of the circle to be complimented and encouraged by everyone else.

Discussion Time:

Read these stories, poems, & quotes/do the activities, and then start a discussion.

Initiative:

  • Do you wait to be told to do something that you know needs to be done? Initiative is: doing the right thing without being told. Doing it before someone else does. Also, it can involve doing more than what you were told to do. Being the first one to do something good. Lack of initiative is assuming someone else will do it. “So whoever knows the right thing to do and fails to do it, for him it is sin.” James 4:17 Talk about what the children are doing to take initiative. (teach Daniel the Bible, teach Daniel how to do housework, check the job board, pray out first in prayer) Now what else could you work on taking more initiative? (introduce myself to people at church, look for ways to help around the house without being asked, be the first one to smile or say I love you, do my lessons before I am told to, start a friendship with someone new, find a way to earn some money, look for ways to help around the neighborhood or church)
  • The Stone in the Road by James Baldwin
  • Let each child initiate an activity/project that he or she is interested in. Let them be in charge and tell you what to do if they want help.
  • “It is wonderful how much may be done if we are always doing.” –Thomas Jefferson. Initiative is making ideas happen. (Faith planting apple seeds and all kinds of seeds in the garden) Proverbs 16:3 “Commit thy works unto the LORD, and thy thoughts shall be established.”
  • Grown-up Land by James Bladwin
  • Read pages 48-52 in The Five Little Peppers and end with Mrs. Pepper’s wise comment, “Your ships aren’t ever coming in if you sit there talking. Folks don’t ever make any fortunes by wishing.”
  • Read Psalm 90 with the idea in mind that God makes the difference between a life of meaning and a life that leaves nothing. Meditate on and pray the following verses: “Teach us to number our days, that we may gain a heart of wisdom” and “May the favor of the Lord our God rest on us; establish the work of our hands for us–yes, establish the work of our hands.”
  • The Lesson of the Water Mill Proverbs 3:27-28 “Withhold not good from them to whom it is due, when it is in the power of thine hand to do it. Say not unto thy neighbor, Go, and come again, and to morrow I will give; when thou hast it by thee.”
  • “What you do when you don’t have to, determines what you will be when you can no longer help it.” –Rudyard Kipling
  • The Seed
  • The Silver Crown

Pride:

Bible:

  • Early Morning: Personal time in a variety of Bibles and Bible Storybooks, Leading Little Ones to God Devotional together or a NT excerpt from mommy’s Bible
  • School: Read and narrate stories from Joshua and Judges in the Children’s story Bible by Catherine Vos, or my ESV Study Bible (about 2 chapters a day, 3x a week)
  • Afternoon Quiet Time: Read at pleasure in our Child’s Study Bible tabbed on various topics; Draw and write in Prayer Journals
  • Night: Family Bible study led by daddy 3x a week

Leading Little Ones to God BB01

Memory Verses:

Noah will choose one verse on pride from his tabbed Habit Training Bible for us all to memorize. Also we will review:

  • “In the beginning God created the heaven and the earth.” Genesis 1:1
  • “I will praise Thee; for I am fearfully and wonderfully made. ” Psalms 139:14
  • “Before I formed thee in the belly I knew thee; and before thou camest forth out of the womb I sanctified thee, and I ordained thee a prophet unto the nations. ” Jeremiah 1:5
  • Stewardship Street verses

 Hymns:

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Poetry Recitation:

For a Child

by Fannie Sterns Davis
Your friends shall be the Tall Wind,
The River and the Tree;
The Sun that laughs and marches,
The Swallows and the Sea.
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Your prayers shall be the murmur
Of grasses in the rain;
The song of wildwood thrushes
That makes God glad again.
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And you shall run and wander,
And you shall dream and sing
Of brave things and bright things
Beyond the swallow’s wings.
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And you shall envy no man,
Nor hurt your heart with sighs,
For I will keep you simple
That God may make you wise.

Handwriting:

  • Write for Real Life: written letters, birthday cards, thank you cards, shopping lists, nature journal entries, prayer journal entries, All About Me book, spelling words, poem, or memory verse.
  • Hand write new reading words from Delightful Reading curriculum. (Faith)
  • First 12 lessons in Print to Cursive. (Noah)

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Spelling: (Noah)

Noah will study, word build, hand write, and recite the spelling of all the new reading words from one story a week. We don’t use the Pathway Series readers as readers, but rather as a fun way to provide the words for our spelling. We love the sweet stories in these books.

Reading: (Faith)

Materials:  printed poem, word cards for each of the following words, loose letters                 

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                   Rain

“The rain is falling all around

It falls on tree and field”…….

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Reading Lessons:

1. Write one word from the poem on the board

2. Discuss the word

3. Study it closely, then erase

4. Find the word card from a small pile of cards, then hide the card

5. Spell the word with loose letters (from memory if possible)

6. Find the word in the printed poem

7. Repeat steps 1-6 with each word

8. Do a review of all the words listed up on the board

Word Building Lessons (spelling):

Using loose letters, build words that rhyme with each of the words in the 1st two lines of the poem (ex: rain–Cain, stain, plain, train, gain).

(Lessons 1-4 in Delightful Reading by Simply Charlotte Mason)

Vocabulary:

Most will be learned naturally in conversation as words in question arise, but I also will have Noah look up words sometimes to learn dictionary skills and to spur a love for new words.

Webster's American Dictionary of the English Language, 1828 Edition - By: Noah Webster

Literature Read Alouds:

Trusty Tries To Fly

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History and Geography:

  • SCM’s Joshua-Malachi & Ancient Greece lesson plan book includes 1 chapter a week from a living book and 4 chapters a week from the spine (Bible portion is mentioned above). Noah will either narrate readings orally or narrate in his history sketchbook with a drawing of what he remembers.

Joshua through Malachi & Ancient Greece.  https://i1.wp.com/www.nothingnewpress.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/03/greeks-cover-600x400.jpg

  • One lesson a week from SCM’s Visits to the Middle East lesson plan book
  • Pray for the country of the week (as selected in the lesson plan book) using the prayer points in Window on the World

  • We will also do a few lessons from Home Geography

Math:

Lessons are from Kathy Richardson’s math books and AL Math Card Games:

Understanding Geometry Book

Exploration Time: In the morning just before school, provide pattern blocks, unifix cubes, building blocks, tangrams, geoboards, tiles, pattern blocks, etc. for free exploration of math materials. What can you do with these materials? What did you notice? What did you have to do in order to make it? Try to observe while they are working, and sometimes make a comment about what you observe. When children need a suggestion ask, “I wonder if….” or “Do you think it would work to….?” or “Do you have another idea?,” so that they feel free to decide on their own.

Ongoing Review: Spend a few minutes once a week during math lessons to practice instant recognition of number combinations. Use homemade “flashcards” with arrangements of items that can be counted (like toothpicks or buttons that can be grouped into two numbers upon closer inspection in order to quickly find the total). Hold up a card and say, “Tell me fast. How many?” Sometimes ask, “How did you know?” (Cause there is a four and a three, and that’s seven) When recognizing groups of more than five easily, child will have to mentally combine the smaller groups that make up the larger ones.

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Geometry:

Copy Cat (p.19) Children create structures out of provided or self-selected math materials and their partners copy them. For preschoolers, have their partner add just one block at a time as they copy if you see that they are struggling.

Recording Designs and Creations (p.22)

  • Pattern blocks: Record a pattern block design with pattern block paper shapes or triangle grid paper (for extra challenge). The challenge is in the reproduction. Provide a paper to build upon to control complexity–smaller paper for easier designs, bigger paper for more challenging designs.
  • Tiles: Record with colored paper squares.
  • Geoboards: Record on another geoboard (easier), onto same size geoboard paper (hard), onto smaller geoboard paper (harder), or onto plain paper (hardest). Ask children what they see in their design (“I see a trapezoid, a square, and a rectangle.”)

Noah’s Lessons:

  • Place Value lessons in Book #3 by Kathy Richardson on pages 14-31–learning to regroup by 4’s, 5’s, and 6’s (preparation for grouping by 10’s, the base 10 system).
  • Noah will begin recording subtraction facts in in his blank Subtraction Book, just as he slowly made an Addition Book recording all addition facts (up to 10) that he explored with manipulatives last school year. For example, after doing the “combinations of 7” activity pictured below, he used colored pencils to record his findings (3+4=7, 5+2=7, etc.) with pictures of cubes labeled with number sentences in his book (held in his hands). Each 2 page spread was dedicated to the research compiled for one number. After each math lesson, he would look into his book to see if he had discovered a new combination or if he confirmed one that he had already recorded. IMG_0067

Games:

  • Time to Any Hour (p. 61) Put the hour and minute cards face down in two separate piles. Provide a real clock. Have child form a time by turning over the top minute card and the top hour card, and then set the clock to match.
  • Compare Times (p. 62) Players take turns setting the clock. Then they make the time with their cards.
  • To One Hundred (p. 26) Make a stock pile of 5’s and 10’s cards. Player take the top card and enters that number of beads on his abacus. Players take turns adding by 5’s and 10’s until someone reaches 100 exactly. Variation: Use a hundreds chart instead of an abacus.
  • Addition War (p. 39) Using about 40 1-9 numeral cards, deal the cards out evenly. Players take the top two cards from their stacks, set them face up, add them together, and say the sum aloud. The player with the higher sum takes all four cards. Equal sums means war and each player places two extra cards face down, and then places two more face up to add together. The higher sum takes all the cards.
  • Showing a Number On Various Manipulatives Use an abacus, place value cards, unifix cubes, and a hundreds chart to show a number like 37 or 56 or 94 on various manipulatives.

Extra: Download and print open ended math questions to use as time allows. Ask Noah to provide as many answers as he can (When applicable).

Example of an open ended question:

http://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/FREEBIE-January-Open-Ended-Math-Question-for-Journals-or-Do-Nows-First-Grade-1601205

Faith’s Lessons:

  • Week 1  Counting Stories (p. 30) Materials: Counters and Storyboards or blank paper. Lesson: Tell number stories and have the children act them out using some counters as objects in the stories. Children place the counters on a storyboard that represents the setting for the story. Pass out storyboards–paper with a simple picture of a two lane road for example. Say, “Four trucks are driving down the road. Two cars pass them. Count the trucks and cars.” Children place counters on the storyboard and add them up. Extensions: Have children make up their own counting stories. Write the numerals on a small chalkboard as you say them so the children can learn to associate numerals with the amounts they represent (or don’t say the number as you write it if children are familiar with numerals). Or have children write their own numerals (placing counters right on top of the chalkboard).
  • Week 2 Creations (p. 33) Materials: Unifix cubes, creation cards. Lesson: Create a model out of unifix cubes (resembling a simple animal for example), or use the provided creation cards in the book. Have children build a matching creation exactly as shown by the model or creation card, and without laying it on top of the model or card. Extension: Have children record the number of cubes they used to build each creation (writing or numeral card).
  • Week 3 Rhythmic Patterns (p. 90 & 95) Materials: Unifx cubes. Lesson: Have children copy a rhythmic pattern you make up like ‘Nod, nod, clap; nod, nod, clap…..’. Labeling the parts of the rhythmic pattern aloud using letters can be helpful (A, A, B; A, A, B……) Have the children make the ‘Nod, nod, clap’ pattern with unifix cubes. Say the cube pattern the children chose with both colors (green, green, yellow; green, green, yellow……) and letters (A, A, B; A, A, B……). Extension: Make sure children are also exposed to other patterns such as ABC, AABB, ABB, etc.
  • Week 4 Is it More or Less? (p. 146) Materials: Unifix cubes. Lesson: Have children build several trains of specified lengths (all under ten). Say, “Show me a train that has more than six. Show me a train that has less than six.” State the relationship together: “Four is less than six, six is more than four.” Repeat with trains of various lengths. Extension: Decide how many more or how many less one train has than the other. “What can we do to the red train to make it just as long as the blue train?” is easier than “How many more cubes does the red train have than the blue train?” Choose the wording your children are ready for.

          Games:

  • Missing Card (p.10) Lay out cards 1-10 in order, remove one card and close the gap. Have the child guess which number is missing.
  • Consecutive Numbers (p.12) Using 4 sets of 1-10 cards, deal 3 cards to each player, and put the rest in a stock pile. Player puts any card down (and draws another card), next player puts down the next highest number or the preceding lower number. Player may add to a row or start a new one. When the third card is put down in a row, that player collects that row. Player with most cards wins.
  • Dot and Number Memory (p.14) Match even and odd dot cards to matching numeral cards (all placed in order in two separate rows upside down).
  • Even Odd Dot Memory (p.15) Same as game above except one person collects evens, the other collects odds (to become more aware of the difference).
  • Build a staircase on the abacus

Nature Study:

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Spanish:

We will try out a couple lessons from Speaking Spanish, which uses Charlotte Mason methods.

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Videos:

Reading Rainbow, Moody Science Classics, BBC’s Planet nature shows are what we rotate through at Family Movie Night on Fun Friday. We love all 3!

READING RAINBOW:DESERT LIFE

Traditions and Fun Friday Projects:

  • Finger paint and foot paint to showcase our children’s unique prints

  • Draw or paint a self portrait in September and June, and keep them to track children’s developmental and artistic growth

  • Beginning of the School Year Tradition: Make an “All About Me” book (alternatively, older children could write themselves a letter including predictions about their future). We really treasure our books from previous years.

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Last year Noah really enjoyed the ease of this book from Lakeshore Learning Store.

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This year we will write and illustrate the story of our lives in a hardcover blank book like this from Rainbow Resource. Just one page a day or so.

Portrait Lined Big Bare Book - Lined | Main photo (Cover)

  • Fun Apple Study Ideas

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  • Make Cupples filled with hot apple cider and a cinnamon stick straw

  • A cute back to school snack idea

Bus snack

  • First day badges give some pomp and circumstance to the 1st day of school

“Kindergarten 2014”

First Day Giggles

  • Pick a school year theme. Hang a Banner that describes whats on our hearts for our kids to accomplish this year, and then talk about specific goals on the first day of school or at a special dinner the night before with daddy. This year “imagine” is on my heart. Pick a verse to believe for this year.
    I pray that the eyes of your heart may be enlightened (that you may imagine!), so that you will know what is the hope of His calling,
    what are the riches of the glory of His inheritance in the saints
    (Ephesians 1:18)

  • Celebrate! Setting the tone visually will heighten expectation because kids are very literal. Show them how special this school year will be– as a new beginning, a fresh start– with a beautifully set breakfast table (which can also incorporate your theme). This table is incredible, but even simple gestures can make a big impression.

Back to School Dinner | www.thevintagemother.com

  • And don’t forget to have the camera ready!

  • Come up with some sort of first day interview (alternatively, here is a sweet one that focuses on eliciting cute things from kids about their teacher, ie. mommy!)

  • Invite a Neighbor to Tea

Tea Invitation for Doris

  • Make a Mommy and Me date with each child and share with them how special they are to me

Took my Sweetie to a Tea House

Fieldtrips:

  • Markham Nature Park and the lake at Hidden Lakes Park–observe and journal
  • Nature Grubs–games with sticks and stones with East Bay Parks naturalist Katie Colbert on September 2nd
  • Apple Hill–to pick apples from the orchards! Read about apples in the Handbook of Nature Study, and read some apple themed picture books. Saturday, September 26th

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Have a beautiful school year friends!!!

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